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be not worth a plug nickel

obsolete To be completely worthless or useless; to have little or no value. (A variant of "not worth a plugged nickel.") Refers to coins (not only nickels) that were "plugged"—that is, those that had a hole drilled in their center and were filled with cheaper metals—which made the coins illegitimate and worthless if spotted. Primarily heard in US. I was so excited when my grandpa said he'd give me his car, but this old clunker isn't worth a plug nickel. Over the years working here I've come to realize that the boss's promises aren't worth a plug nickel.
See also: nickel, not, plug, worth

get plugged into (something)

To become directly or very closely involved in, attuned to, or enthusiastic about something. Friends have gotten me plugged into the work of various performance artists around the city. It wasn't until college that I really got plugged into the heavy metal scene.
See also: get, plug

be plugged into (something)

To be directly or very closely involved in, attuned to, or enthusiastic about something. My wife has a lot of friends who are plugged into various performance arts around the city. I've been really plugged into the heavy metal scene ever since college.
See also: plug

put a/the plug in the jug

To become permanently sober; to give up intoxicants, especially alcohol. (Alludes to plugging up a jug of an alcoholic beverage.) I've always loved my dad, but he's become a much friendlier and sympathetic person since finally putting the plug in the jug. It took me waking up in a ditch and covered in vomit to realize that I needed to put a plug in the jug for good.
See also: jug, plug, put

not worth a plug nickel

obsolete Completely worthless or useless; having little or no value. (A variant of "not worth a plugged nickel.") Refers to coins (not only nickels) that were "plugged"—that is, those that had a hole drilled in their center and were filled with cheaper metals—which made the coins illegitimate and worthless if spotted. Primarily heard in US. I was so excited when my grandpa said he'd give me his car, but this old clunker isn't worth a plug nickel. Over the years working here I've come to realize that the boss's promises aren't worth a plug nickel.
See also: nickel, not, plug, worth

spark plug

One who energizes others with one's ideas and positive personality. Primarily heard in US. Kelly was the spark plug the company needed to get their new project off the ground.
See also: plug, spark

(I'm) (just) plugging along.

Inf. I am doing satisfactorily.; I am just managing to function. Bill: How are things going? Bob: I'm just plugging along. Sue: How are you doing, Fred? Fred: Just plugging along, thanks. And you? Sue: About the same.
See also: plug

not worth a damn

Inf. worthless. This pen is not worth a damn. When it comes to keeping score, she's not worth a damn.
See also: damn, not, worth

plug away (at something)

 and peg away (at something)
to keep trying something; to keep working at something. John kept pegging away at the trumpet until he became pretty good at it. I'm not very good at it, but I keep plugging away.
See also: away, plug

plug (oneself) in (to something)

to become attached to something; to become attached to some sort of network or system. As soon as I have plugged my laptop into the local network, I will have access to the Internet. I plugged myself into the computer network and began to communicate quickly and efficiently.
See also: plug

plug something into something (and plug something in)

to connect something to something else, usually by connecting wires together with a plug and socket. Plug this end of the wire into the wall. Plug in the lamp and turn it on.
See also: plug

plug something up

to stop or fill up a hole, crack, or gap. Take out the nail and plug the hole up with something. You have to plug up the cracks to keep out the cold.
See also: plug, up

pull the plug

 (on someone)
1. Lit. to turn off someone's life-support system in a hospital. (Based on pull the plug (on something) {2}. This results in the death of the person whose life support has been terminated.) They had to get a court order to pull the plug on their father. Fred signed a living will making it possible to pull the plug on him without a court order.
2. Fig. to put an end to someone's activities or plans. (Based on pull the plug (on something) {2}.) The mayor was doing a fine job until the treasurer pulled the plug on him. David pulled the plug on Fred, who was taking too long with the project.
See also: plug, pull

pull the plug

 (on something)
1. Lit. to terminate the functions of something by pulling a connector from a socket. While she was working at the computer, I accidentally pulled the plug. I pulled the plug on the vacuum because the switch was broken.
2. Fig. to reduce the power or effectiveness of something; to disable something. Jane pulled the plug on the whole project. The treasurer pulled the plug because there was no more money in the budget.
See also: plug, pull

put a plug in (for someone or something)

to say something favoring someone or something; to advertise someone or something. I hope that when you are in talking to the manager, you put a plug in for me. I could use some help. While you're there, put in a plug.
See also: plug, put

plug away (at something)

to keep working in a determined way He's experienced plenty of hard times, but Ed is still plugging away, playing several nights a week at a local jazz club. The powerful computer was plugging away at the problem for weeks.
See also: away, plug

pull the plug (on something)

to stop something from continuing The judge is threatening to pull the plug on TV coverage of the trial.
See also: plug, pull

pull the plug

to do something which prevents an activity from continuing, especially to stop giving money (often + on ) If the viewing figures drop much further, the TV company will pull the plug on the whole series.
See also: plug, pull

a spark plug

  (American informal)
a person with a lot of energy and ideas who encourages the other people in a group The school's new principal is the spark plug in a team that includes parents, teachers and community.
See also: plug, spark

not worth a damn

Also, not worth a plugged nickel or red cent or bean or hill of beans or fig or straw or tinker's damn . Worthless, as in That car isn't worth a damn, or My new tennis racket is not worth a plugged nickel. As for the nouns here, a damn or curse is clearly of no great value (also see not give a damn); a plugged nickel in the 1800s referred to a debased five-cent coin; a cent denotes the smallest American coin, which was red when made of pure copper (1800s); a bean has been considered trivial or worthless since the late 1300s (Chaucer so used it), whereas hill of beans alludes to a planting method whereby four or five beans are put in a mound (and still are worthless); and both fig and straw have been items of no worth since about 1400. A tinker's dam, first recorded in 1877, was a wall of dough raised around a spot where a metal pipe is being repaired so as to hold solder in place until it hardens, whereupon the dam is discarded. However, tinker's damn was first recorded in 1839 and probably was merely an intensification of "not worth a damn," rather than having anything to do with the dam.
See also: damn, not, worth

peg away at

Also, plug away at. Work steadily, persist, as in She pegged away at the tax return until she'd finished, or If we keep plugging away at it, the painting will soon be done. These idioms allude to the persistence required to fasten something by driving pegs or seal something by driving a plug. Peg away dates from the early 1800s plug away from the mid-1900s.
See also: away, peg

plugged in, be

Be closely attuned or responsive, as in He couldn't make any important social connections because he just wasn't plugged in. The related expression be plugged into takes an object, as in These connoisseurs are plugged into the local art scene. These terms allude to inserting a plug into an electrical socket. [Colloquial; c. 1970]
See also: plug

pull the plug on

1. Discontinue, end, as in The government pulled the plug on that program. [First half of 1900s]
2. Remove all life-supporting equipment, as in The family debated whether it was time to pull the plug on him. [Second half of 1900s] Although this idiom undoubtedly alludes to cutting off electricity to an electrical device, it originally referred to the removal of a stopper that flushed an old-style toilet.
See also: on, plug, pull

plug in

v.
1. To insert a part of some object into another, especially to make a mechanical or electrical connection: He plugged in the iron and waited for it to get hot. If you don't plug the phone in, you won't get any telephone calls.
2. To function by being mechanically or electrically connected to another object: That radio plugs in, but it can also run on batteries.
See also: plug

plug into

v.
To insert a part of some object into an outlet, socket, or some other receptacle, especially to make a mechanical or electrical connection: Plug the iron into the electrical outlet. I plugged the speakers into the back of the receiver.
See also: plug

plug up

v.
1. To obstruct the path or passageway through, into, or out of something: An orange rind plugged up the sink. Leaves have plugged the storm drain up.
2. To be obstructed so that substances cannot pass through: The hose plugged up and eventually burst.
3. To cause the path through, into, or out of something to become obstructed: They plugged up the leaks in the boat with tar. We plugged the hole up with a cork.
See also: plug, up

not worth a damn

mod. worthless. When it comes to keeping score, she’s not worth a damn.
See also: damn, not, worth

not worth a plugged nickel

mod. worth little or nothing. This new battery is not worth a plugged nickel.
See also: nickel, not, plug, worth

pluck

and plug
n. wine; cheap wine. (Originally black.) He buys pluck by the box, yes the box! You spilled your plug all over my car seat!

plug

verb
See pluck

plug

1. n. a bite-sized, pressed mass of chewing tobacco. He put a plug in his cheek and walked away.
2. n. a drink of beer; a slug of beer. Let me have a plug out of that bottle.
3. n. a free advertisement or a commercial boost from someone for a product. (see also plugola.) I managed to get a plug on the Mike Michael show.
4. tv. to give an advertisement or commercial boost for something without having to pay for it. I want to get on that TV program and plug my new book.
5. Go to pluck.

plugged in

mod. excited by drugs; having to do with the drug culture; turned on. (Drugs.) That punker is plugged in, for sure.
See also: plug

plug-ugly

mod. very ugly. (see also pug-ugly.) Your dog is just plug-ugly!

pull the plug (on someone/something)

tv. to put an end to someone or something as a problem; to defuse a problem caused by someone or something. (As if one were disconnecting an electrical appliance.) I’ve heard enough from Mr. Jones. It’s time to pull the plug on him.
See also: on, plug, pull

pull the plug

verb
See also: plug, pull

pull the plug on

Slang
To stop supporting or bring to an end: pulled the plug on the new art courses.
See also: on, plug, pull
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