pluck

(redirected from plucking)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

a lot of pluck

Courage, nerves, determination, or resolve, especially in the face of adversity or hardship. You've got a lot of pluck, kid, standing up to a big brute like that.
See also: lot, of, pluck

a crow to pluck

An issue to discuss—typically one that is a source of annoyance for the speaker. Hey, I have a crow to pluck with you! Why didn't you put gas in my car after you borrowed it?
See also: crow, pluck

Mother Carey is plucking her chickens

It is snowing. This phrase alludes to "Mother Carey's chickens," which is what sailors call birds they believe are indicative of poor weather. Bundle up, men—Mother Carey is plucking her chickens, so we're in for another rough day on the trail.
See also: Carey, chicken, mother, pluck

pluck (something) out of the/thin air

To say or produce something haphazardly or at random, rather than through careful consideration or calculation. Look, this legislation hasn't been plucked out of thin air. We've spent months crafting the bill to best serve all of our citizens. Her ability to ad lib is so remarkable that it's hard to believe she's plucking these jokes out of the air.
See also: air, of, out, pluck, thin

pluck a rose

obsolete euphemism Of a woman, to excuse oneself from present company to go urinate. With a demure look, she murmured that she must go pluck a rose, and excused herself quietly from the room.
See also: pluck, rose

pluck (something) from air

To say or produce something haphazardly or at random, rather than through careful consideration or calculation. Look, this legislation hasn't been plucked from the air. We've spent months crafting the bill to best serve all of our citizens. Her ability to ad lib is so remarkable that it's hard to believe she's plucking these jokes from the air.
See also: air, pluck

get enough nerve up (to do something)

 and get enough courage up (to do something); get enough guts up (to do something); get enough pluck up (to do something); get enough spunk up (to do something); get the nerve up (to do something); get the courage up (to do something); get the guts up (to do something); get the pluck up (to do something); get the spunk up (to do something)
Fig. to work up enough courage to do something. I hope I can get enough nerve up to ask her for her autograph. I wanted to do it, but I couldn't get up enough nerve. I thought he would never get up the courage to ask me for a date.
See also: enough, get, nerve, up

pluck at someone or something

to pull or pick at someone or something. Kelly plucked at Ed, picking off the burrs that had caught on his clothing. Kelly plucked at the strings of the guitar.
See also: pluck

pluck something from someone or something

to pick, grab, or snatch something from someone. Sally plucked a chocolate from the box and popped it into her mouth. He stooped over and plucked a rose from the bush.
See also: pluck

pluck something off (of) someone or something

 and pluck something off
to pick something off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) She plucked the mosquito off his back before it could bite him. She plucked off the bud.
See also: off, pluck

pluck something out of something and pluck something out

to snatch something out of something. She plucked the coin out of his hand and put it in her pocket. Reaching into the fountain, Jane plucked out the coin.
See also: of, out, pluck

pluck up someone's courage

to bolster someone's, including one's own, courage. I hope you are able to pluck up your courage so that you can do what has to be done. Some good advice from a friend helped pluck up my courage.
See also: courage, pluck, up

pluck up one's courage

Also, screw up one's courage. Force oneself to overcome fear or timidity, as in He was really afraid of slipping on the ice, but he plucked up his courage and ventured down the driveway , or I screwed up my courage and dove off the high board. The first term uses pluck in the sense of "make a forcible effort"; Shakespeare put it as "Pluck up thy spirits" ( The Taming of the Shrew, 4:3). The variant derives from the use of screw to mean "force or strain by means of a screw."
See also: courage, pluck, up

pluck something from the air

If someone plucks a figure from the air, they say it without considering it carefully or using correct information. There seems little point in trying to keep statistics when figures are plucked from the air in order to support any given claim. Note: You can also say that someone plucks a figure out of the air or plucks a figure out of thin air. So few buildings are coming to market that accurate valuations are becoming almost impossible to make. Numbers are simply being plucked out of the air. The figure of 40% was not plucked out of thin air. Note: Verbs such as pull or pick can be used instead of pluck. She pulled a figure out of the air, an amount she thought would cover several months' rent on an office.
See also: air, pluck, something

pluck a rose

(especially of a woman) urinate. dated euphemistic
See also: pluck, rose

pluck/screw/summon up (your/the) ˈcourage (to do something)

force yourself to be brave enough to do something: I had liked her for a long time, and eventually I plucked up the courage to ask her out.I finally screwed up my courage and went to the dentist.
See also: courage, pluck, screw, summon, up

pluck something out of the ˈair

say a name, number, etc. without thinking about it, especially in answer to a question: I just plucked a figure out of the air and said: ‘Would £1 000 seem reasonable to you?’
See also: air, of, out, pluck, something

pluck

and plug
n. wine; cheap wine. (Originally black.) He buys pluck by the box, yes the box! You spilled your plug all over my car seat!
References in periodicals archive ?
Medical reasons for feather plucking are rare but need to be ruled out before further action is taken.
O~ur historical studies have uncovered a number of episodes that correspond precisely to the notion of downward pluckings of the money string.
As well as the plucking championship, the farm will be open all day with attractions such as static farm tractors and machinery, a "meet and greet" of the farm animals of alpacas and moles, and children's attractions.
An indicator of feather plucking is feather loss and/or mutilated feathers in body areas accessible to a bird's beak.
The most important feature of the invention is that it is light enough to be positioned on the plucking table by raising and lowering it in order to take only the flush and to avoid small growing shoots and mature foliage.
As a first step in reducing labor requirements, most estates have tried shear plucking, but the majority have abandoned this because productivity was not as great as had been hoped; bushes were often damaged and quality was impaired.
1BEFORE plucking, cleanse brows thoroughly with warm water to prevent any grease or dirt entering the open hair follicles and causing irritation.
The wide, straight edges are fine for tackling lots of hairs in one go, but not for precision plucking.
And as plucking is something that involves a certain level of pain, it really pays to make sure you've got the right tools for the job.
Anastasia swears by brow waxing every three weeks, then plucking stray hairs in between.
Rule 1 Use two mirrors - hold a magnifying compact mirror for a close- range view when you're doing the plucking, but every so often stand in front of a large wall mirror to judge your handiwork from a distance.
l Pluck corresponding hairs from alternate brows rather than plucking one side then the other.
When plucking, work on both brows at the same time rather than working on one and then having to match up the other afterwards.