pleasure

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guilty pleasure

Something that one enjoys or finds pleasurable but knows or feels to be bad, inferior, aberrant, or lowbrow, especially as might be perceived or judged by other people. I know these gossip magazines are trashy, but reading them on my commute home is my guilty pleasure!
See also: guilty, pleasure

lady of pleasure

euphemism A prostitute. A: "I think that Lord Stewart is spending time with a lady of pleasure." B: "No, surely not!"
See also: lady, of, pleasure

Business before pleasure.

Prov. You should finish your work before starting to relax and enjoy yourself. Alan: Hi, Ted. Shall we get something to drink? Ted: Business before pleasure, Alan. Do you have the reports I asked you to bring? I'd love to go water-skiing with you now, but I have a few things to do in the office first. Business before pleasure, I'm afraid.

He that would go to sea for pleasure, would go to hell for a pastime.

Prov. Being a sailor is so unpleasant that anyone who would do it for fun must be crazy. Old Sailor: Why did you decide to go to sea? Young Sailor: I thought it would be fun. Old Sailor: He that would go to sea for pleasure, would go to hell for a pastime.
See also: he, hell, sea

(I) don't believe I've had the pleasure.

Fig. an expression meaning I haven't met you yet. Tom: I'm Tom Thomas. I don't believe I've had the pleasure. Bill: Hello. I'm Bill Franklin. Tom: Nice to meet you, Bill. Bill: Likewise. Bob: Looks like rain. Fred: Sure does. Oh, I don't believe I've had the pleasure. Bob: I'm Bob, Bob Jones. Fred: My name is Fred Wilson. Glad to meet you.
See also: believe, pleasure

My pleasure.

 
1. You're welcome.; It is my pleasure to do so. (From It's my pleasure. There is a stress on both words.) Mary: Thank you for bringing this up here. Bill: My pleasure. Jane: Oh, Doctor, you've really helped Tom. Thank you so much! Doctor: My pleasure.
2. Happy to meet you.; Happy to see you. Sally: Bill, meet Mary, my cousin. Bill: My pleasure.
See also: pleasure

stolen fruit is sweetest

 and stolen pleasures are sweetest
Prov. People often enjoy illicit things just because they are illicit. To judge from the number of his extramarital affairs, John must believe that stolen pleasures are sweetest.
See also: fruit, stolen, sweet

There is no pleasure without pain.

Prov. For every pleasure you enjoy, you must suffer some pain. We had a fabulous vacation, but it's going to take us years to pay for it. Oh, well, there's no pleasure without pain. Yesterday I basked in the warm sunshine all afternoon; today I'm badly sunburned. There is no pleasure without pain.
See also: pain, pleasure, without

With pleasure.

a phrase indicating eager consent to do something. Fred: Would you please take this note over to the woman in the red dress? Waiter: With pleasure, sir. Sue: Would you kindly bring in the champagne now? Jane: With pleasure.
See also: pleasure

mix business with pleasure

to combine work and social activities Weekend getaways that allow you to mix business with pleasure have become fashionable.
See also: business, mix, pleasure

mix business with pleasure

to combine work with social activities or enjoyment (usually negative) Let's keep this relationship strictly professional. I prefer not to mix business with pleasure.
See also: business, mix, pleasure

my pleasure

Used to acknowledge an expression of gratitude.
See also: pleasure
References in classic literature ?
But it's my belief you'd sell yourself, if it was only for the pleasure of making somebody feel he'd got a bad bargain.
I am waiting for the distribution of the pleasures, Mousqueton, and with impatience.
You have a hierarchy of values; pleasure is at the bottom of the ladder, and you speak with a little thrill of self-satisfaction, of duty, charity, and truthfulness.
If, on the other hand, he take pleasure in naval tactics, he will assuredly have full scope for his taste.
The first of pleasures, that which at the outset comprehends all the others, is set about with such perils that it is impossible not to reflect upon the least actions which it provokes, impossible not to calculate all its consequences.
And those who make pleasure their good are in equal perplexity; for they are compelled to admit that there are bad pleasures as well as good.
dear lady, if I could but work for you; if I could only give you pleasure by watering your flowers, or watching your birds, or running up and down the whole day long, to make you happy; what would I give to do it
He heard her with the most earnest attention, but seeming to recollect himself, said no more on the subject, and began directly to speak of his pleasure at seeing them in London, making the usual inquiries about their journey, and the friends they had left behind.
Believe me, no civilized man ever regrets a pleasure, and no uncivilized man ever knows what a pleasure is.
Miss Bingley's civility to Elizabeth increased at last very rapidly, as well as her affection for Jane; and when they parted, after assuring the latter of the pleasure it would always give her to see her either at Longbourn or Netherfield, and embracing her most tenderly, she even shook hands with the former.
To a man who had but little to do with pleasure sailing (though all sailing is a pleasure), and certainly nothing whatever with racing in open waters, the writer's strictures upon the handicapping of yachts were just intelligible and no more.
The pleasure he felt was in his face as he said, "My grandfather and I hope all our friends here have enjoyed their dinner, and find my birthday ale good.
And so saying, he was hurrying away, before Fanny, overpowered by a thousand feelings of pain and pleasure, could attempt to speak; but quickened by one sovereign wish, she then called out, "Oh
But, in fact, the 'Paradise Regained' is little, if at all, inferior to the 'Paradise Lost,' and is only supposed so to be because men do not like epics, whatever they may say to the contrary, and, reading those of Milton in their natural order, are too much wearied with the first to derive any pleasure from the second.
The poet, that beautified the sect, that was otherwise inferior to the rest, saith yet excellently well: It is a pleasure, to stand upon the shore, and to see ships tossed upon the sea; a pleasure, to stand in the window of a castle, and to see a battle, and the adventures thereof below: but no pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of truth