play fast and loose (with someone or something)

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play fast and loose (with someone or something)

To act recklessly, unreliably, irresponsibly, or thoughtlessly toward someone or something; to treat someone or something with a lack of respect or seriousness. I know these tabloids play fast and loose with the truth, but they're such a guilty pleasure of mine! I can assure you that I am not playing fast and loose with him; I intend to marry him some day. If you're going to play fast and loose, go work at another firm. That's not how we operate here.
See also: and, fast, loose, play, someone

play fast and loose (with someone or something)

Fig. to act carelessly, thoughtlessly, and irresponsibly. I'm tired of your playing fast and loose with me. Leave me alone. Bob got fired for playing fast and loose with the company's money.
See also: and, fast, loose, play

play fast and loose

Be recklessly irresponsible, unreliable, or deceitful, as in This reporter is known for playing fast and loose with the facts. This term probably originated in a 16th-century game called "fast and loose," played at country fairs. A belt was doubled and held with the loop at table's edge, and the player had to catch the loop with a stick as the belt was unrolled-an impossible feat. The term was already used figuratively by the late 1500s, especially for trifling with someone's affections.
See also: and, fast, loose, play

play fast and loose

If someone plays fast and loose with something important, they treat it without care, respect or accuracy. The government is playing fast and loose with public spending. Several of the company's announcements have been exposed for playing fast and loose with the facts.
See also: and, fast, loose, play

play fast and loose

ignore your obligations; be unreliable.
Fast and loose was the name of an old fairground game, in which a punter was challenged to pin an intricately folded belt, garter, or other piece of material to a surface. The person running the game would inevitably show that the item had not been securely fastened or made ‘fast’, and so the punter would lose their money. The phrase came to be used to indicate inconstancy.
1996 Time Out The big MGM production typically plays fast and loose with the facts, so it's as much an action spectacular as a genuine historical chronicle.
See also: and, fast, loose, play

play fast and ˈloose (with somebody/something)

(old-fashioned) treat somebody/something in a way that shows that you feel no responsibility or respect for them: If he plays fast and loose with my daughter’s feelings, I’ll make sure he regrets it.
See also: and, fast, loose, play

play fast and loose

verb
See also: and, fast, loose, play

play fast and loose

To behave in a recklessly irresponsible or deceitful manner: played fast and loose with the facts.
See also: and, fast, loose, play
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of the Stockholder who once knew how to play fast and loose with her scavenged goods, we discover an academic who, literally, bolts everything in place and forfeits the appearance of spontaneity and accident that once served her art so well.
If he is willing to play fast and loose with the law, why would we not expect he plays fast and loose with the facts over secession?
The opinion upholds the public policy and purpose of the securities laws, and sends a message to insiders that they cannot play fast and loose with their trades in company stock," said Rick Spoonemore, an attorney for Dreiling.
David Reed's paintings play fast and loose with the conventions of abstraction and representation--an exercise that could be very dull--but the luxurious, even brazen appeal of his seemingly flattened-out yet liquescent brushstrokes remains irresistibly seductive.
The evidence suggests that Bernson and his aides play fast and loose with the city's ethics laws.
This lawsuit serves notice that we will not stand by and have the good name of our Organization sullied by anyone who thinks they can play fast and loose with the facts concerning the integrity of an institution that many people view as an American ideal.
Water must not be a rare commodity in Santa Clarita, where they can afford to play fast and loose with public money.
It's another thing when a couple of white guys think they've got equal rights to play fast and loose with "black" representations.
Congratulations to leaders of the Federation of Hillside and Canyon Associations for blowing the whistle on another scheme at City Hall to play fast and loose with voter-approved park funds.