play


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play

1. n. a strategy; a plan of action. That was a bad play, Bill. We lost the account.
2. n. an attractive investment; a way to make some money in the securities markets. I just heard about a good play in the options market.

play

/act the fool
1. To act in an irresponsible or foolish manner.
2. To behave in a playful or comical manner.
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References in classic literature ?
A short silence succeeded her leaving them; but her brother soon returned to business and Lovers' Vows, and was eagerly looking over the play, with Mr.
Because I wish to play FOR MYSELF," I replied with a feigned glance of astonishment.
The excitement now had become so intense that a small boy, following with the crowd, swallowed his chewing-gum; for a slight improvement had become noticeable in Gossett's play, and a slight improvement in the play of almost anyone meant that it became vastly superior to Archibald's.
But here in Manator, when they play in the great arena with living men, that rule is altered," explained Lan-O.
By the very nature of their huge deals and enterprises they had to play fair.
Forgetting that he was only a brute, he posited that this was no more than a brute with which he strove to play in the genial comradely way that the Skipper played.
Violinist, play that over again, now, 'Home, Sweet Home,'--let her go.
Each guild had its patron saint, and after a time the members of a guild began to act a play on their saint's day in his honor.
In the latter case each play might remain all day at a particular station and be continuously repeated as the crowd moved slowly by; but more often it was the, spectators who remained, and the plays, mounted on movable stages, the 'pageant'-wagons, were drawn in turn by the guild-apprentices from one station to another.
It was a heart-rending spectacle, but the audience, seeing that the play had stopped, became angry and began to yell:
To say the truth, I believe many a hearty curse hath been devoted on the head of that author who first instituted the method of prefixing to his play that portion of matter which is called the prologue; and which at first was part of the piece itself, but of latter years hath had usually so little connexion with the drama before which it stands, that the prologue to one play might as well serve for any other.
Then we fellows in quarters, we play just about in front of goal here, and have to turn the ball and kick it back before the big fellows on the other side can follow it up.
Then, aloud, she said doggedly: "See here, Miss Pollyanna, I ain't sayin' that I'll play it very well, and I ain't sayin' that I know how, anyway; but I'll play it with ye, after a fashion--I just will, I will
Then the theatre is open for nothing, then the waters of Monblaisir begin to play (it is lucky that there is company to behold them, for one would be afraid to see them alone)--then there come mountebanks and riding troops (the way in which his Transparency was fascinated by one of the horse-riders is well known, and it is believed that La Petite Vivandiere, as she was called, was a spy in the French interest), and the delighted people are permitted to march through room after room of the Grand Ducal palace and admire the slippery floor, the rich hangings, and the spittoons at the doors of all the innumerable chambers.
These were the plays that we loved, and must have read in common, or at least at the same time: but others that I more especially liked were the Histories, and among them particularly were the Henrys, where Falstaff appeared.