plate


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Related to plate: My Plate

fashion plate

1. An illustration advertising the newest or most current trends in style and fashion. She had a keener eye for designing attractive fashion plates than for fashion itself.
2. By extension, a person who wears the most stylish and fashionable clothing available. In this moneyed area of town, it's not uncommon to see fashion plates parading themselves along the main streets at any given moment.
See also: fashion, plate

gold-plate

1. Literally, to coat something (usually a base metal) in a thin layer of gold. I just don't understand why you would ever want—let alone need—to gold-plate your bathtub.
2. By extension, to incorporate unnecessary, superfluous, and/or overbearing refinements, additions, or embellishments into something. Congress took what should have been a straightforward clean water initiative and gold-plated it into a cumbersome, overreaching, and wildly impractical mess of a bill. Knowing that the city council would be footing the bill, the architect tried to gold-plate the design for the new courthouse.

hand (something) to (someone) on a plate

To give or relinquish something to someone very easily, without him or her having to work very hard to get or achieve it. The team's defense has been atrocious today, handing a victory to their opponents on a plate. If we can get the government to subsidize our project, we'll have our yearly earnings handed to us on a plate.
See also: hand, on, plate

have enough on (one's) plate

To be sufficiently busy or preoccupied with work, problems, or difficulties as to be unable or unwilling to cope with anything more. I really wish I could help you move this weekend, but I have enough on my plate as it is!
See also: enough, have, on, plate

a lot on (one's) plate

A lot to do. I just have a lot on my plate right now while I'm finishing up my degree and doing this huge project for work.
See also: lot, on, plate

full plate

A schedule or workload that is filled to capacity with obligations, tasks, or problems. I'd love to help you but I have a full plate right now. The new president is certainly going to have a full plate when he gets into office.
See also: full, plate

on (one's) plate

A non-specific way to speak of all the tasks or responsibilities that one must address. I'm sorry I'm late, I just have so much on my plate right now. I'll handle the report—I know you've got a lot on your plate right now with the merger and all.
See also: on, plate

clean (up) one's plate

to eat all the food on one's plate. You have to clean up your plate before you can leave the table. Mom said we can't watch TV tonight unless we clean our plates.
See also: clean, plate

full plate

Fig. a full schedule; a lot to do. I'm very busy at work, and I've got a full plate at home too.
See also: full, plate

have too much on one's plate

 and have a lot on one's plate
Fig. to be too busy. I'm sorry, I just have too much on my plate right now. If you have too much on your plate, can I help?
See also: have, much, on, plate

step up to the plate

 
1. Lit. [for a batter in baseball] to move near home plate in preparation for striking the ball when it is pitched. The batter stepped up to the plate and glared at the pitcher.
2. Fig. to move into a position where one is ready to do a task. It's time for Tom to step up to the plate and take on his share of work.
See also: plate, step, up

a full plate

a lot of work to do or problems to deal with Facing funding cuts and a lawsuit challenging the school's admissions policy, the university's new president has a full plate.
See also: full, plate

step up to the plate

to take responsibility for doing something It is time companies stepped up to the plate and made sure the meat they sell is safe to eat.
Related vocabulary: step in
Etymology: based on the baseball meaning of step up to the plate (move into position to hit the ball)
See also: plate, step, up

somebody's head on a plate/platter

if you want someone's head on a plate you are very angry with them and want them to be punished The director was furious at what had happened and wanted Watt's head on a platter.
See also: head, on, plate

give/hand something to somebody on a plate

to let someone get something very easily, without having to work for it You can't expect everything to be handed to you on a plate - you've got to make a bit of effort.
See also: give, on, plate

have a lot/enough on your plate

  also have your plate full
to have a lot of work to do or a lot of problems to deal with I don't want to burden my daughter with my problems; she's got enough on her plate with her husband in prison. Simon can't take on any more work. He's got his plate full as it is.
See also: have, lot, on, plate

hand to on a silver platter

Also, serve up on a plate. Provide with something valuable for nothing, or give an unearned reward to; also, make it easy for. For example, She did no work at all, expecting to have everything handed to her on a silver platter, or Just ask them-they'll serve up the data on a plate. Both terms allude to being elaborately served at the table. [Early 1900s] Also see born with a silver spoon.
See also: hand, on, platter, silver

have a lot on one's plate

Also, have too much on one's plate. Have a great deal (or too much) to cope with, as in What with the new baby and the new house, they have a lot on their plate, or I can't take that on now; I've got too much on my plate already. This expression transfers a loaded or overloaded dinner plate to other activities. [First half of 1900s]
See also: have, lot, on, plate

platter

platter

1. and plate n. home base or home plate in baseball. (Usually with the.) The batter stepped up to the platter.
2. n. a phonograph record. (Old but still heard.) They call it a “platter” because it looks like a serving platter.

plate

verb

step up to the plate

phr. to voluntarily assume responsibility for something. (From baseball, referring to a batter approaching home plate.) The company stepped up to the plate and paid for the time and effort I spent repairing the unit.
See also: plate, step, up
References in classic literature ?
And D'Artagnan, with all the marks of mortal disquietude, seized the plate, to read the inscription.
Nay, good master," quoth he, "if thou thinkest the Sheriff gave us not the plate, I will fetch him, that he may tell us with his own lips he giveth it all to us.
Then she noticed the silence, and forgot the plate in a desire for something to happen.
He proposed to fix the plate within two hundred yards of the gun.
They do not make the whole three-sided pyramidal base of any one cell at the same time, but only the one rhombic plate which stands on the extreme growing margin, or the two plates, as the case may be; and they never complete the upper edges of the rhombic plates, until the hexagonal walls are commenced.
Here he was interrupted and even agitated for a moment by the removal of his plate, but he recaptured the valuable thread of his thoughts.
She was idly arranging her little morsels of ham in a pattern on her plate.
Just as a photographic plate receives a different impression of a cluster of stars when a telescope is part of the intervening medium, so a brain receives a different impression when an eye and an optic nerve are part of the intervening medium.
O Dives, who would ever have thought, as we sat round the broad table sparkling with plate and spotless linen, to have seen such a dish at the head of it as that roaring auctioneer?
As to the small parcel of plate and spoons, I had found means to dispose of them myself before; and as for the childbed-linen I had, she offered me to take it herself, believing it to have been my own.
Hideous solidity was the characteristic of the Podsnap plate.
Yes, to be sure--Who won the Helter-Skelter Plate, child?
Crupp said it was clear she couldn't be in two places at once (which I felt to be reasonable), and that 'a young gal' stationed in the pantry with a bedroom candle, there never to desist from washing plates, would be indispensable.
As a whaler I have followed many a cetacean, harpooned a great number, and killed several; but, however strong or well-armed they may have been, neither their tails nor their weapons would have been able even to scratch the iron plates of a steamer.
Between the vases is a cheerful decoration of preserved coffin plates -- five in all, pertaining respectively to Janet's father and mother, a brother, her sister Anne, and a hired man who died here once