plaster


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Related to plaster: gypsum plaster

plaster (one's) hair down

To cause one's hair to lie flat on one's head by using a large or excessive amount of water or hair products (such as oil, cream, gel, etc.). I don't understand why you plaster your hair down with gel like that—it looks so geeky! I get such bad bedhead that I have to plaster my hair down with water before I can even run a comb through it.
See also: down, hair, plaster

plaster on

To smear some substance onto and all over something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plaster" and "on." They plastered red paint on the sides of the embassy to protest the unlawful killings. The artist stood in front of the canvas and began plastering on mud, grass, and sand.
See also: on, plaster

plaster (something) onto (something)

To smear some substance onto and all over something. They plastered red paint onto the sides of the embassy to protest the unlawful killings. Mud was plastered onto our clothing after we got up out of the ditch.
See also: plaster

plaster over

1. To cover something up with plaster or some other pastelike mixture. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plaster" and "over." We'll have to plaster over all these marks and holes in the wall before we move, or they might not give us our security deposit back. I hope they'll pay to plaster over the cracks in the ceiling.
2. To spread or smear plaster or some other pastelike mixture over something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plaster" and "over." They plastered mud and excrement over the rival school's front doors. Mix up a bucket of whitewash and plaster it over the fence round back.
3. To fill, flood, or overwhelm some area of public discourse some kind of information. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plaster" and "over." Someone from his school started plastering rumors about him over social media. Details of the affair are being plastered over the news lately.
See also: over, plaster

plaster up

To cover or close something with plaster or some other pastelike mixture. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plaster" and "up." We'll have to plaster all these marks and holes up in the wall before we move, or they might not give us our security deposit back. They tried to plaster up the cracks in the ceiling with paint, but it obviously did nothing to fix the problem.
See also: plaster, up

plaster (something) with (something)

To cover ever inch of some surface with something. They plastered the walls with gaudy pink paint. The alleyway was plastered with posters of her performance. We plastered our faces with mud to help us remain undetected on our approach to the camp.
See also: plaster

plaster one's hair down

Fig. to use water, oil, or cream to dress the hair for combing. (The result looks plastered to the head.) Tony used some strange substance to plaster his hair down. He plastered down his hair with something that smells good.
See also: down, hair, plaster

plaster over something

to cover over something with plaster. I think that we will just plaster over the cracks in the wall.
See also: over, plaster

plaster something onto something

 and plaster something on
to spread a substance onto something. She plastered great globs of the jam onto the toast. She plastered on lots of butter.
See also: plaster

plaster something up

to close something up with plaster; to cover over holes or cracks in a wall with plaster. He plastered the cracks up and then painted over them. You have to plaster up the cracks.
See also: plaster, up

plaster something with something

to spread some substance onto something. Jane plastered each slice of bread with butter and then heaped on a glob of jam. She plastered the wall with a thin coat of fine white plaster.
See also: plaster
References in periodicals archive ?
Usually, they're made of brick or block, plastered over with a bonding plaster (or a stuck sheet of plasterboard) and topped with a finishing plaster.
A common way to do this is with watered-down emulsion (known as a mist coat), as the plaster sucks up the water and becomes less absorbent.
New plaster is very absorbent and although there are paints and sealers designed for it, a common way to seal it is with watered-down emulsion, as the plaster sucks up the water.
Overview of the plaster and lime products market in Denmark
To make a hanger for the sand casting, stick the paper clip into the top side (determine this before you pour the Plaster of Paris) of the exposed Plaster of Paris after it has started to firm up just a little bit.
l Use a PVA adhesive and water mix to help the plaster bond to the walls.
The first activity was for students to select, sand and stain a wood block that would become a base for their plaster sculpture.
It may sound extreme but the only way to fix them - whether hairline or large gaps - is to cut out the crack and fill with fine casting plaster or DK Dental plaster - better known as plaster of Paris.
Two other plants in Riyadh and Yanbu produce 12 million sq m of plaster board annually.
Some of the rooms have the original plaster, and some have been drywalled over
To provide the best complement to the old building's limestone-block facade, time-honored lath and plaster was the first choice.
We would like to correct the misstatement about on-Balance's position on plaster etching, as reported in the article "Arch Study Tackles Plaster Problem" (Nov.
Johnson then consolidated several plaster casting processes from other firms and partnered with a gypsum company to develop an aerating plaster that could be used as a mold material.