plant

(redirected from plants)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

plant a/the seed of doubt (in someone's mind)

To cause someone to have doubts, worries, or concerns (about something); to introduce someone to a doubtful or worrisome idea. The candidate was doing very well in the polls six months ago, but it seems that this smear campaign has been effective in planting a seed of doubt in the minds of voters. Recent economic turbulence in the Eurozone has planted the seed of doubt about the strength of the economy's recovery. Every time you act suspiciously like that, it plants a seed of doubt in my mind about your fidelity.
See also: doubt, of, plant, seed

soap plant

Any plant that produces a lather that can be used for cleansing. Examples include the California soap plant, the soapberry, and the soapwort. My mom makes all-natural soap out of soap plants.
See also: plant, soap

plant a seed

1. To lay the groundwork for something that can develop or expand in the future. By involving the community in our plans, we hope to plant a seed for an event that will grow into a neighborhood tradition for years to come.
2. To introduce an idea to someone with the intention of making them more likely to eventually support or agree with it. I casually mentioned the idea of my mom watching Noah some weekends. Just planting a seed so she might be open to it down the line.
See also: plant, seed

plant the seeds

1. To do something that ensures a certain outcome in the future, especially an unfortunate or tragic one. They've been planting the seeds of their own downfall with their anti-consumer practices over the last few years.
2. To cause someone to have certain thoughts or feelings, usually negative ones. The over-zealous policing of opposing opinions has planted the seeds of discontent among the population.
See also: plant, seed

plant the seeds of (something)

1. To do something that ensures a certain outcome in the future, especially an unfortunate or tragic one. They've been planting the seeds of their own downfall with their anti-consumer practices over the last few years.
2. To cause someone to have certain thoughts or feelings, usually negative ones. The over-zealous policing of opposing opinions has planted the seeds of discontent among the population.
See also: of, plant, seed

plant something in something

 
1. Lit. to set out a plant in something; to sow seeds in something. Are you going to plant tomatoes in these pots? What have you planted in the garden?
2. Fig. to put an idea in someone's brain, head, or thinking. Who planted that silly idea in your head? I want to plant this concept in her thinking.
3. Fig. Inf. to conceal something in something. The crook planted the money in the back of the refrigerator. What did the cops plant in your pockets?
See also: plant

plant something on someone

 
1. to hide incriminating evidence on a person for later discovery and use in prosecution. (Drugs. Allegedly a police practice used to entrap drug offenders.) The cops planted crack on Richard and then arrested him for carrying it. Don't touch me! You'll plant something on me!
2. to conceal narcotics or other contraband on an unsuspecting person for the purpose of smuggling. (This person will bear the risk of discovery and arrest.) The crooks planted the stuff on a passenger, but couldn't find him when the plane landed. Someone had planted coke on me, and the airport security officer found it.
See also: on, plant

sow the seeds of something

or

plant the seeds of something

COMMON
1. If something or someone sows or plants the seeds of a future problem, they start the process which causes that problem to develop. An incident then occurred that was to sow the seeds of the invasion's eventual failure. It was this racist policy that planted the seeds of today's crisis in Africa.
2. You can also sow or plant the seeds of something good or something that you want to happen. With this overall strategy, they hope to sow the seeds of economic recovery. Ministers had spent five years planting the seeds of reform. I had planted the seeds of doubt in their minds.
See also: of, seed, something, sow

plant/sow the ˈseeds of something

start a process which will develop into something large, important, etc: What first planted the seeds of doubt in your mind?The seeds of conflict were sown when oil was discovered on the border between the two countries.
See also: of, plant, seed, something, sow

plant

1. tv. to strike a blow (to a particular place on someone). The boxer planted a good blow on his opponent’s shoulder.
2. n. a spy who secretly participates in criminal activities in order to inform on the criminals. Don’t tell everything you know. You don’t know who’s a plant and who isn’t.

plant something on someone

1. tv. to hide incriminating evidence on a person for later discovery and use in prosecution. (see also flake.) The cops planted snow on Bart and then arrested him for carrying it.
2. tv. to conceal narcotics or other contraband on an unsuspecting person for the purpose of smuggling. (This person will bear the risk of discovery and arrest.) The crooks planted the stuff on a passenger but couldn’t find him when the plane landed.
See also: on, plant, someone, something
References in periodicals archive ?
Two questions invariably arise whenever the subject of overwatering and its danger to plants are discussed.
recycling plants send fiber to four of the seven Durango mills in Mexico, according to Rogelio Silva, a procurement manager for the company.
These plants will all want to be in dappled shade and moist but well-drained ground, so they go nicely at the foot of moisture-tolerant trees like Bald-cypress (Taxodium distichum), Overcup Oak (Quercus lyrata), River Birch (Betula nigra) and Black-gum (Nyssa sylvatica)--these last two echoing the gold and red shades in fall foliage.
Yellow-rattle sneaks suckers over to the roots of other plants and steals sap.
Organizations such as the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Union of Concerned Scientists now talk in terms of the proper role of government in energy policy and ensuring the safe operation of nuclear plants, rather than whether nuclear power should even be considered.
We can unload in five or 10 minutes and be ready to crush," he says of the tracked crushing plants Recycling & Processing Equipment uses.
It said that, instead of putting in fire barriers, nuclear plants could rely on personnel to turn the plant off by hand in the event of a fire that threatens the reactor.
Most meat-eating plants produce enzymes (proteins that aid in body functions) that liquefy the insect's soft tissues.
Questions about corporate responsibility, sustainable harvesting and indigenous partnerships were the focus of the second annual Industrial Leadership for the Preservation of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants symposium, held in Philadelphia last October.
Plant Location: Greenville, SC (Press & Dryer Fabrics)
Visitors could spend hours in such tree-filled places as Rock Creek Park, a truly urban national park in Northwest Washington; in Civil War-era forts such as Fort Dupont, east of the Anacostia River; and at Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, which features unusual trees among its water lilies and aquatic plants.
Because FASB is proposing a standard that would change how utilities account for nuclear decommissioning costs, it is imperative that CPAs at utilities with nuclear plants examine the standard's implications for their companies.
Another ensures that even personnel from visiting contractors receive training in the plants safety procedures.