plane

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Related to planing: planning, root planing

plane away

To grind, erode, or shave something until it has been totally removed (from something), leaving a smooth surface behind. Originally reserved for references to the carpenter's tool known as a "plane," the phrase is often applied to anything that has a smoothing or erosive force. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plane" and "away." This is just a rough cut of the timber—I still need to plane the imperfections away. The harsh weather planed away the names of those buried in the cemetery from their headstones.
See also: away, plane

plane down

1. To grind, erode, or shave something until it is made smooth or reduced in size. Originally reserved for references to the carpenter's tool known as a "plane," the phrase is often applied to anything that has a smoothing or erosive force. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plane" and "down." Make sure you plane down the sides of the car to reduce air resistance as much as possible. Erosion has planed the great cliffs down to a fraction of the size they were millions of years ago.
2. To grind, erode, or shave something until it has been totally removed (from something), leaving a smooth surface behind. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plane" and "down." This is just a rough cut of the timber—I still need to plane the imperfections down. The harsh weather planed down the names of those buried in the cemetery from their headstones.
See also: down, plane

plane off

To grind, erode, or shave something until it has been totally removed (from something), leaving a smooth surface behind. Originally reserved for references to the carpenter's tool known as a "plane," the phrase is often applied to anything that has a smoothing or erosive force. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plane" and "off." This is just a rough cut of the timber—I still need to plane the imperfections off. The harsh weather planed off the names of those buried in the cemetery from their headstones.
See also: off, plane

steer away from (someone or something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle in a direction away from someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "away" to specify what is being driven. I steered away from the truck that was stopped in the middle of the road. She managed to steer the car away from the crowd of people at the last moment.
2. To avoid interacting with someone. Steer away from the boss today—he's yelling at everyone he sees. I always try to steer away from toxic or negative people in my life.
3. To avoid pursuing, utilizing, or committing to something. I suggest you steer away from the trains today—there's a strike on, so none of them are on time. I think we would do well to steer away from such drastic measures.
4. To attempt to convince or persuade someone to avoid someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "away." I try to steer people away from that brand, to be honest. They may be less expensive, but those computers are notorious for breaking down. She keeps trying to steer me away from her brother, but he and I are just naturally drawn to each other.
See also: away, steer

steer into (something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle into something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "into" to specify what is being driven. I swerved to avoid the truck that was barreling toward us and steered right into the side of a building. She steered her boat into the harbor. The maniac steered his van right into a crowd of people.
2. To guide, direct, or lead someone into some situation. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "into." The star quarterback helped steer the team into the playoffs for the first time in nearly 40 years. That dodgy financial advisor steered us into all sorts of bad investments.
See also: steer

steer through (something)

1. To manage to drive (a vehicle) through some difficult, dangerous, or adverse impediment or weather condition. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "through" to specify what is being driven. I didn't feel confident enough to steer the car through all the snow and ice on the ground, so I let Mary drive instead. It was difficult steering through such turbulent weather, but I knew we had to get back to shore as soon as we could. How could you even steer through such thick fog?
2. To navigate or maneuver (a vehicle) through some passage or obstacle. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "through" to specify what is being driven. I don't know how we'll be able to steer through this crowd of people. We had to steer the boat through the series of buoys the police has set in the harbor. My mother always finds it so stressful having to steer her car through these narrows streets of this town whenever she comes to visit me.
3. To guide or direct someone through some passage or obstacle. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "through." I'd feel better if Mark were there to help steer you through those treacherous mountain roads. The captain of the ship steered us through the narrow river so we could see some more of the indigenous jungle wildlife.
4. To guide or direct someone through some difficult, confusing, or convoluted situation or process. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "through." We hired a lawyer to steer us through the application for our permits. Our advisors will help steer you through the various options at your disposal for your retirement fund.
See also: steer, through

steer toward (something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle in the direction of someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "toward" to specify what is being driven. Keep the boat steady and toward the lighthouse. The police officer told me to steer the car toward a checkpoint on the side of the road. The pilot began steering the plane toward the nearest airport.
2. To attempt to convince or persuade someone to choose, consider, or become involved with someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "toward." Mary said she wanted to go out with Mark, but I tried to steer her toward Mike instead. These pushy salespeople always try to steer you toward the more expensive options. I always try to steer my clients toward sensible investments that will yield steady, long-term growth.
See also: steer, toward

plane something away

to smooth off bumps or irregularities with a plane. Please plane the bumps away so that the board is perfectly smooth. Sam planed away the bumps.
See also: away, plane

plane something down

to smooth something down with a plane; to remove some material from something with a plane. I will have to plane the door down before I hang it again. I planed down the edge of the door for you.
See also: down, plane

plane something off

to remove bumps, nicks, or scrapes by planing. Plane the rough places off so the surface will be as smooth as possible. Sam planed off the bumps.
See also: off, plane