pique

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in a pique

Fig. having a feeling of resentment; feeling that one's pride has been hurt. In a real pique, Anne insulted all of her friends. John's found himself in a pique over Bob's harsh criticism.
See also: pique

pique someone's curiosity

 and pique someone's interest
to arouse interest; to arouse curiosity. The advertisement piqued my curiosity about the product. The professor tried to pique the students' interest in French literature.
See also: curiosity, pique
References in classic literature ?
She was piqued at Betts Shoreham's indifference, had known her present admirer several months, if dancing in the same set can be called KNOWING, and had never been made love to before, at least in a manner so direct and unequivocal.
Hunsden's language now bordered on the impertinent, still his manner did not offend me in the least--it only piqued my curiosity; I wanted him to go on, which he did in a little while.
When I observed the striking devotion of the natives to him, and their temporary withdrawal of all attention from myself, I felt not a little piqued.
Because, madam," replied Buckingham, piqued, "because the faithful Parry, the wandering Parry, the eternal Parry, is not, I believe, of much consequence.
Piqued at their raillery, he had been practicing ever since he had joined the expedition, but without success.
He had never said as much before, and I must admit that his words gave me keen pleasure, for I had often been piqued by his indifference to my admiration and to the attempts which I had made to give publicity to his methods.
For only an instant my curiosity was piqued, and then I replaced the torch in my pocket-pouch, but my fingers had not unclasped from it when there rushed to my memory the recollection of the conversation between Lakor and his companion when the lesser thern had quoted the words of Thurid and scoffed at them: "And what think you of the ridiculous matter of the light?
This piqued me, so, loading the express with solid ball, I waited till my friend walked some ten yards out from his force, in order to get a better view of our position, accompanied only by an orderly; then, lying down and resting the express on a rock, I covered him.