piping


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pipe up

To make oneself heard; to interrupt or interject. The meeting was just about over when Tom piped up and asked why we hadn't looked at the budget. I'm sorry, if you can't hear me, just raise your hand and I'll pipe up.
See also: pipe, up

pipe (one's) eye

dated To weep. I could not help piping my eye at the thought of my dear, sweet son being away from home for Christmas.
See also: eye, pipe

pipe down

To become quiet and calm; to stop being loud or boisterous. Often said as a command. OK, class, pipe down! Let's begin our lesson, shall we? We piped down when we realized he was trying to tell us something important.
See also: down, pipe

piping hot

Very hot. Usually said of food that has just been taken out of the oven and has steam "piping" out of it. Cook the casserole in the oven for 40 minutes or until it is golden brown and piping hot.
See also: hot, piping

pipe away

To remove some gas or liquid (from something or some place) using one or more pipes. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pipe" and "away." We'll need to pipe away the toxic gas before we can activate the reactor. Piping groundwater away from the construction site should be our first priority.
See also: away, pipe

pipe in

1. To supply something or some place with a gas or liquid using one or more pipes. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pipe" and "in." The investigation revealed that the automotive dealer had been piping in nitrous oxide to relax potential customers and make them more susceptible to purchasing a car. We just need to pipe water in and the house will be ready for us to move in.
2. To play music in something or some place through speakers. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pipe" and "in." We've found that piping in music can really help the animals relax when they arrive. I wish the foreman wouldn't pipe in the same crappy pop music every single day on the job.
See also: pipe

pipe (something) into (something or some place)

1. To supply something or some place with a gas or liquid using one or more pipes. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pipe" and "in." The investigation revealed that the automotive dealer had been piping nitrous oxide into its waiting rooms to relax potential customers and make them more susceptible to purchasing a car. We just need to pipe water into the house and it will be ready for us to move in.
2. To play music in something or some place through speakers. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pipe" and "in." We've found that piping music into the shelter can really help the animals relax when they arrive. I wish the foreman wouldn't pipe same crappy radio station into the building site every single day on the job.
See also: pipe

pipe down

to become quiet; to cease making noise; to shut up. (Especially as a rude command.) Pipe down! I'm trying to sleep. Come on! Pipe down and get back to work!
See also: down, pipe

pipe something away

to conduct a liquid or a gas away through a pipe. We will have to pipe the excess water away. They piped away the water.
See also: away, pipe

pipe up (with something)

Fig. to interject a comment; to interrupt with a comment. Nick piped up with an interesting thought. You can always count on Alice to pipe up.
See also: pipe, up

piping hot

[of food] extremely hot. On a cold day, I like to eat piping hot soup. Be careful! This coffee is piping hot!
See also: hot, piping

pipe down

Stop talking, be quiet, as in I wish you children would pipe down. This idiom is also used as an imperative, as in Pipe down! We want to listen to the opera. It comes from the navy, where the signal for all hands to turn in was sometimes sounded on a whistle or pipe. By 1900 it had been transferred to more general use.
See also: down, pipe

pipe up

Speak up, as in Finally she piped up, "I think I've got the winning ticket," or Pipe up if you want more pancakes. This term originally referred to a high, piping tone. [Mid-1800s]
See also: pipe, up

piping hot

Very hot, as in These biscuits are piping hot. This idiom alludes to something so hot that it makes a piping or hissing sound. [Late 1300s]
See also: hot, piping

piping hot

very hot.
Piping describes the hissing or sizzling noise made by food taken very hot from the oven. The phrase was earliest used by Chaucer in The Miller's Tale: ‘And wafres, pipyng hoot out of the gleede’ (‘gleede’ is an obsolete word for a fire).
1997 Sunday Times Try the chilli cakes… served piping hot from food stalls on the beach.
See also: hot, piping

pipe down

v. Slang
To stop talking; become quiet: Pipe down—I'm trying to sleep!
See also: down, pipe

pipe up

v.
To join a conversation with an opinion, especially unexpectedly: You should have piped up if you didn't agree with us.
See also: pipe, up

pipe down

in. to become quiet; to cease making noise; to shut up. (Especially as a rude command.) Pipe down! I’m trying to sleep.
See also: down, pipe

piping hot

Very hot: piping hot biscuits.
See also: hot, piping
References in periodicals archive ?
A computer-automated manufacturing process produces piping in diameters from 18 to 110 inches in diameters.
Instead of focusing on nest sites, she decided to study how people affect the foraging behavior of the piping plover.
She began by observing piping plovers at several New Jersey beaches, including Brigantine Beach, a flat, sandy stretch backed by a belt of dunes, just north of Atlantic City.