pipeline

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be in the pipeline

To be in progress. Don't worry, your raise is in the pipeline for next quarter. I hear some big changes are in the pipeline.
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in the pipeline

In progress or about to be started or implemented. Don't worry, your raise is in the pipeline for next quarter. I hear some big changes are in the pipeline.
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in the pipeline

Fig. backed up somewhere in a process; in process; in a queue. There's a lot of goods still in the pipeline. That means no more new orders will be shipped for a while. Your papers are in the pipeline somewhere. You'll just have to wait.
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in the pipeline

1. In process, under way, as in The blueprints for the new machine are in the pipeline, but it will take months to get approval . [Colloquial; 1940s] Also see in the works.
2. Budgeted for something but not yet spent, as in There's $5 million more in the pipeline for the city schools. [Colloquial; second half of 1900s]
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in the pipeline

COMMON If something is in the pipeline, it is being planned or developed. New security measures are in the pipeline, including closed-circuit TV cameras in most stores. Over 350 major hospital schemes have been completed. There are nearly 300 more in the pipeline. Note: Another American expression that means the same is in the works.
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in the pipeline

being planned or developed; about to happen.
1992 Sunday Times of India In effect, this means that two bio-pics on Buddha are in the pipeline for release in 1993 .
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in the ˈpipeline

already being considered, planned, prepared or developed, but not yet ready: We have an interesting new database program in the pipeline. It should be on sale early next year.
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in the pipeline

mod. backed up somewhere in a process; in process; in a queue. There are a lot of goods still in the pipeline. That means no more orders for a while.
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in the pipeline

Under way, in process or in progress. The word pipeline entered the language in the latter half of the nineteenth century, and by the 1920s the term was used also for a channel of supplies or information. The current cliché came into use about thirty years later. “All these reforms will take time . . . there are measures in the pipeline already,” editorialized the London Observer in 1964.
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to OPS's annual figures (which are subject to change as more data come in), pipelines in 2000 suffered their worst year in terms of causing economic damage--$156,925,184 worth to be exact--nearly double the $86,856,82 OPS totaled for 1999.