pip


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like a chicken with the pip

In low spirits; in a weak or sickened state or manner. Poor little Johnny's been feeling like a chicken with the pip lately. I think he must have picked up a bug at school.
See also: chicken, like, pip

be pipped to the post

To be defeated or overcome by someone by a very narrow margin or at the final, crucial moment, especially in a race, competition, or athletic event. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, Ireland. The favoured runner held the lead for the majority of the race, but he was pipped to the post by a relatively unknown competitor in the final 100 metres. It appears the current MP has been pipped to the post, being narrowly defeated by the youngest person to ever serve in parliament.
See also: pip, post

pip (someone) at the post

To defeat or succeed over someone by a very narrow margin or at the final, crucial moment, especially in a race, competition, or athletic event. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, Ireland. The favoured runner held the lead for the majority of the race, but a relatively unknown competitor pipped him at the post in the final 100 metres. It appears the young candidate is set to pip his competitor at the post for his seat in parliament, which would make him the youngest candidate from this constituency to do so in nearly 60 years.
See also: pip, post

pip (someone) to the post

To defeat or succeed over someone by a very narrow margin or at the final, crucial moment, especially in a race, competition, or athletic event. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, Ireland. The favoured runner held the lead for the majority of the race, but a relatively unknown competitor pipped him to the post in the final 100 metres. It appears the young candidate is set to pip his competitor to the post for his seat in parliament, which would make him the youngest candidate from this constituency to do so in nearly 60 years.
See also: pip, post

be pipped at the post

To be defeated or overcome by someone by a very narrow margin or at the final, crucial moment, especially in a race, competition, or athletic event. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, Ireland. The favoured runner held the lead for the majority of the race, but he was pipped at the post by a relatively unknown competitor in the final 100 metres. It appears the current MP has been pipped at the post, being narrowly defeated by the youngest person to ever serve in parliament.
See also: pip, post

give (one) the pip

To cause one to be annoyed or unhappy. Although the "pip" is an avian disease, it came to be used to describe minor human maladies. My new job is giving me the pip—all they let me do is make copies and send faxes.
See also: give, pip

squeeze (someone or something) until the pips squeak

To use force or pressure to exploit someone for as much money, information, manpower, etc., as someone has or is able to give. Primarily heard in UK. We were hoping to start our own business, but those loan sharks squeezed us until the pips squeaked with insanely high interest rates. Interrogators are planning to squeeze the captured spy until the pips squeak for all the information he may have about the enemy's plans.
See also: pip, squeak, squeeze, until

pipped (up)

Sl. intoxicated. I'm not drunk. Just a little pipped up. She's pipped and ready to get sick.
See also: pip

pip someone at the post

or

pip someone to the post

BRITISH
If you pip someone at the post or pip them to the post, you just beat them in a competition or race to achieve something. Note: The following expressions refer to the finishing post in a horse race. She applied for a job at the university, but she got pipped at the post by a man with more publications to his name. He was pipped at the post for BAFTA's best Actor award by Robert Downey Jr.
See also: pip, post, someone

give someone the pip

make someone irritated or depressed. informal, dated
Pip is a disease of poultry or other birds. In the late 15th century the word came to be used, often humorously, of various ill-defined or minor ailments suffered by people and so the informal sense of ‘ill humour’ developed.
1976 Scotsman I feel it's my duty but I'm not keen. My grandchildren give me the pip.
See also: give, pip, someone

pip someone at (or to) the post

defeat someone at the last moment.
Pip was an informal late 19th-century term for ‘defeat’, but it is uncertain from which sense of the noun pip it derives. Post here is the winning post in a race.
See also: pip, post, someone

squeeze someone until the pips squeak

extract the maximum amount of money from someone. British
This expression alludes to a speech made in 1918 by the British politician Sir Eric Geddes on the subject of Germany's payment of indemnities after World War I: ‘The Germans…are going to pay every penny; they are going to be squeezed as a lemon is squeezed—until the pips squeak’. More recently, in the 1970s, the Labour Chancellor Denis Healey declared his intention to squeeze the rich until the pips squeaked.

pip somebody at/to the ˈpost

(British English, informal) beat somebody in a race, competition, etc. by only a small amount or at the last moment: We thought we’d won the contract, but we were pipped at the post by a rival company.I was winning the race until Tina came up behind me and pipped me to the post.
See also: pip, post, somebody

pip

1. n. a pimple; a zit. Good grief, I’ve got ear-to-ear pips!
2. n. postindustrial person. (Usually PIP. Acronym. A cynical reference to a person as a member of a group that has become useless because of technological change.) The world really doesn’t really need more PIPs, except as consumers, of course.
3. n. illness; a mild, nonspecific disorder. (Old colloquial.) Grandpa’s complaining again. Says it’s the pip.

pipped (up)

mod. alcohol intoxicated. I’m not drunk. Just a little pipped up.
See also: pip, up

pipped

verb
See also: pip
References in periodicals archive ?
In Pip camera- photo editor plus Background photo is blurred automatically, you can add filters to background or foreground or both to pop any part of your photos.
Mrs Fletcher says this shows a failure in the system for assessing PIP claimants.
QAPI at a Glance, is another of the technical tools issued by CMS that can help PIP teams move their missions forward.
According to a chart accompanying the OIR statement, seven insurers met the 25% PIP premium-reduction target: three Geico companies, two Progressive companies, USAA and Security National Insurance Co.
Four other PIP executives were sentenced to between 18 months and three years in prison with some of the time suspended.
Patrick O'Flaherty of PIP Organic said: "We are extremely excited about the new launch and growing the PIP Organic drinks family and the range distribution.
At this point Pip knows only that he's an escaped convict anxious to be freed from his chains.
Unscrupulous PIP dippers caused the average cost of each claim to rise by more than 60 percent over the past four years.
Dr Grant Stevens compared 500 PIP implants with 500 implants manufactured by Mentor Siltex.
PIP closed down in March 2010 and in December 2011 the French government advised women with PIP implants to have them removed, sparking alarm around the world.
PIP, founded by one-time butcher Jean-Claude Mas, produced about 100,000 implants a year before its products were ordered off the market in early 2010.
Pip and the Wood Witch Curse is the first book in the 'Spindlewood Tales' series.
Pip is a fuzzy caterpillar whose legs don't work together well.
HE WAS believed to be Britain's last surviving pit pony, but the death of Pip has severed a link with the region's mining heritage.
Seven-year-old Pip sits at his parents' tombstones in the marshes.