pinko (commie)

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pinko (commie)

1. noun Someone who holds liberal, socialist, or communist political views or beliefs. My uncle was labeled as a pinko all his life for trying to improve workers' rights in his region. So you want the government to give everyone free housing, free healthcare, and free food? What are you, some kind of pinko commie?
2. adjective Having very liberal, socialist, or communist political views or beliefs. It's pinko liberals like you who are driving up our taxes! My pinko commie brother thinks anyone making a profit for themselves is
See also: pinko

pinko

1. n. a communist. (Popular during the 1950s.) Get out of here, you pinko!
2. mod. having communist tendencies; in the manner of a communist. Get that pinko jerk out of here!
References in periodicals archive ?
The Klan are just a few crazies who get together to mouth off about niggers and Jews and pinkos and faggots, then go back to their dumb-ass jobs in liquor stores and filling stations.
Of course, the press and TV (or what Kennesaw's good ol' boys would call "the pinko liberal media") descended on the town, portraying the place as a gun-crazy Dodge City where everybody walked down Main Street at high noon, their trigger-fingers itching.
But it's an uncomfortable fact for pinko liberals everywhere that 18 years on, while the town's population has almost doubled from around 5,000 to 10,000, the burglary rate has more than halved, from 11 per thousand head of population to less than three.
While the pinkos will squawk that buses are environmentally- friendly, a recent survey by Calor Gas found that car-free zones like Oxford city centre and London's Oxford Street showed huge levels of Nitrogen Oxide.
By squandering six valuable years listening to the demented rantings of tree-hugging pinkos, they've reduced the UK's roads to a smoking ruin.
It may not go down well with the politically correct pinkos - but county cricket has had precious few decent captains since the days when Oxbridge amateurs ran the game like Army colonels.