pillar


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Related to pillar: Pillar procedure

pillars to the temple

euphemism A woman's legs. Primarily heard in UK. I'm always attracted to women with great legs, and Sara's pillars to the temple are just phenomenal.
See also: pillar

pillar of strength

A supportive or emotionally strong person. My aunt has been a pillar of strength for me, helping me through many difficult moments in my life.
See also: of, pillar, strength

from pillar to post

Fig. from one place to a series of other places; (figuratively) from person to person, as with gossip. My father was in the army, and we moved from pillar to post year after year. After I told one person my secret, it went quickly from pillar to post.
See also: pillar, post

pillar of strength

 and pillar of support
someone or something that consistently provides moral, emotional, or financial support as does a pillar. My parents are my pillars of support. John looked to God as his pillar of strength.
See also: of, pillar, strength

send someone from pillar to post

Fig. to send someone to many different places, none of which is the correct place. (Compare this with send someone on a wild-goose chase.) Jill sent Roger from pillar to post to look for a special kind of paper. Roger was sent from pillar to post with his problem.
See also: pillar, post, send

a pillar of strength

someone who is emotionally very strong Roger was a pillar of strength when my father died.
See also: of, pillar, strength

from pillar to post

  (British & Australian)
if someone goes from pillar to post, they are forced to keep moving from one place to another After his mother died, Billy was passed from pillar to post and ended up in a children's home.
See a pillar of strength
See also: pillar, post

a pillar/tower of strength

someone who gives a lot of support to someone else who is in a difficult situation Roger was a tower of strength when my parents died.
See also: of, pillar, strength

from pillar to post

From one thing or place to another, hither and thither. For example, After Kevin joined the Air Force, the family kept moving from pillar to post. This expression began life in the early 1400s as from post to pillar, an order no longer used, and is thought to allude to the banging about of a ball in the game of court tennis.
See also: pillar, post

send someone from pillar to post

tv. to send someone from place to place; to give someone the runaround. Red tape everywhere I went. They sent me from pillar to post until closing time.
See also: pillar, post, send

from pillar to post

From one place to another; hither and thither.
See also: pillar, post
References in classic literature ?
At an indefinite height overhead something made the black sky blacker, which had the semblance of a vast architrave uniting the pillars horizontally.
she asked, when they had listened a long time to the wind among the pillars.
In the far north-east sky he could see between the pillars a level streak of light.
The eastward pillars and their architraves stood up blackly against the light, and the great flame-shaped Sun-stone beyond them; and the Stone of Sacrifice midway.
he exclaimed at the full force of his lungs, twining like a serpent around his pillar.
Let the reader picture to himself now, this immense, oblong hall, illuminated by the pallid light of a January day, invaded by a motley and noisy throng which drifts along the walls, and eddies round the seven pillars, and he will have a confused idea of the whole effect of the picture, whose curious details we shall make an effort to indicate with more precision.
The crowd grew more dense every moment, and, like water, which rises above its normal level, began to mount along the walls, to swell around the pillars, to spread out on the entablatures, on the cornices, on the window-sills, on all the salient points of the architecture, on all the reliefs of the sculpture.
demanded Jehan Frollo du Moulin, who, as he was clinging to one of the inner pillars, could not see what was going on outside.
In the second, building pillars to keep 'em out is purely a Cypriote trick, unworthy of British bees.
Pillars are un-English and provocative, and a waste of wax that is needed for higher and more practical ends," said the Wax-moth from an empty store-cell.
The youngsters told off to the pillars had refused to chew scrap-wax because it made their jaws ache, and were clamouring for virgin stuff.
Seems as if we'd have to chew scrap-wax for these pillars, after all," said a worker.
The ultimate one--that is a good word--but the pillars are not both on the same side of the strait.
In one room were seven pillars of solid gold, and in another the floor itself was of the precious metal.
At least we may take the tablets from the walls, though the pillars are too heavy for us to handle; but there should be great storerooms filled with gold--gold that we can carry away upon our backs with ease.