piffle


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piffle

(ˈpɪflæ)
1. n. nonsense. What utter piffle!
2. exclam. a mild exclamation or expression of distress. (Usually Piffle!) She finished her story, and I looked her straight in the eye and said, “Piffle!”

piffled

(ˈpɪflæd)
mod. alcohol intoxicated. Three glasses of booze and she was totally piffled.
See also: piffle
References in periodicals archive ?
Piffle Connect is the newest addition to the growing trend of social game apps.
But aside from the occasional soaring moment - and there are several fine chapters among the 35 - Jordan's intended poetry comes off as piffle.
This is due to legislation dating back to the turn of the century that requires all hackney cabs to be able to accommodate a man wearing a top hat, have space enough for two bales of hay and other pensionable piffle.
Ebert pegs this one as "amiable, inoffensive piffle that benefits from the warmly moronic camaraderie" of its three stars: Seth Green, Matthew Lillard and Dax Shephard.
In the end, it's easier to bash McDonald's than wayward MPs, easier to print feelgood stories about Catholic social action in foreign countries than call Canadian prime ministers to account as practising Catholics, easier to be a prophet of piffle than a sign of contradiction--which is what every Catholic news publication should be in that old watchdog tradition.
2 PHIILIIP, ICICLES AND SPIKE SCULPTURES Even if experimental pop hadn't become the knowing piffle it currently is, these fifteen songs would still stand way, way out.
What Americans don't care much about is the piffle we put on TV these days.
Cynical political handlers may dismiss all these points as academic piffle.
We've heard a lot of piffle from Sister Judith over the years," she tells Finn in a private moment, "but lately I've been fearing for her sanity.
It's not scientific, and the list sometimes includes some highly personal piffle, but it works.
A lot of piffle is perpetuated by so-called financial experts, who think themselves a cut above other mortals.
Some of the Unionist contributors to the Daily Post letters page are obviously unaware of the tyranny carried out by Edward Long Shanks and Henry Tudor and should consider reading When Was Wales by Gwyn Williams and A People's History of England by AL Morton, they may well then question their loyalty to the monarchy and the piffle the established order refer to as a democracy which is nothing more than an elected dictatorship.
George Osborne says this is because of the coalition's actions, but we all know that is ignorant piffle.
WHAT a load of piffle and balderdash from Barry Dennis (Letters, September 25).
The Complete Balderdash and Piffle Collection by Alex Games (BBC Books, pounds 9.