pick (something) off

pick (something) off

1. To remove something that was adhered to something else. Please pick the label off before you put the banana peels in the compost bin. He kept picking off the scabs on his knees—it was making me feel sick!
2. In baseball, to put out a runner by throwing the ball to the baseman. The catcher noticed the other player trying to steal second base, so he turned around and picked him off before he could get back to first.
3. To intercept something that someone else was trying to obtain or achieve. The linebacker was able to pick off the pass and run it into the end zone. I can't believe Jim picked my clients off like that!
See also: off, pick

pick someone or something off (of) someone or something

 and pick someone or something off
to pull or gather someone or something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The teacher picked the little boys off the jungle gym and hurried them back into the school building before the storm hit. Pick off the ripe tomatoes and leave the rest.
See also: off, pick

pick off

Shoot after singling out, as in The hunter picked off the ducks one by one. [Early 1800s]
See also: off, pick

pick off

v.
1. To remove or pluck something from a surface: I picked off the price tag before wrapping the gift. We picked the dead leaves off the plant.
2. To shoot and kill something or someone with a gun, especially from a distance: The hunter picked the ducks off one by one. The sniper picked off an enemy soldier.
3. Baseball To throw the ball to an occupied base and put out a runner who is taking a lead: The catcher picked off the runner as he was trying to steal a base. The runner took a big lead, and the pitcher picked her off at first base.
4. Sports To intercept something, as a pass in American football: The cornerback picked off an errant pass and ran it back for a touchdown. The quarterback threw a low pass and a linebacker picked it off.
See also: off, pick