take a pew

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take a pew

To sit down. Often used as an imperative. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. We're all watching the movie. Take a pew, mate.
See also: take

ˌtake a ˈpew

(British English, spoken, humorous) used to tell somebody to sit down: Good to see you! Take a pew and I’ll get us a drink.
A pew is a long wooden seat in a church.
See also: take
References in periodicals archive ?
Pew has been at the forefront of the battle over payday lending.
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Veterans have always used pews on the left hand side nearest the main altar; last year, one pew was occupied by eight to 10 veterans, leaving several pews unoccupied.
The Pew Research Centre found 11 percent of internet users - or some 9 percent of all American adults - said that they have personally used an online dating site, News24 reported.
The Pew Research Center found 11 percent of Internet users - or some nine percent of all American adults - said they have personally used an online dating site.
In 1965 Pierre Berton wrote a bestselling study of the Anglican Church in Canada entitled The Comfortable Pew.