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Peter Pan syndrome

A psychological state or condition in which a grown person cannot or refuses to act like an adult; a stubborn and persistent immaturity found in an adult person. I seem cursed to only find men who have some damned Peter Pan syndrome. I'm tired of going out with guys who act like children!
See also: pan, peter, syndrome

hoist the blue peter

To leave or prepare to leave. This nautical term refers to the blue and white flag that sailors would hoist before departing from a location. Hoist the blue peter, gentleman, so we can set sail!
See also: blue, hoist, peter

peter out

[for something] to die or dwindle away; [for something] to become exhausted gradually. When the fire petered out, I went to bed. My money finally petered out, and I had to come home.
See also: out, peter

rob Peter to pay Paul

Fig. to take or borrow from one in order to give or pay something owed to another. Why borrow money to pay your bills? That's just robbing Peter to pay Paul. There's no point in robbing Peter to pay Paul. You will still be in debt.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

peter out

to be reduced gradually so that nothing is left The road petered out completely, and there was no choice but to walk the rest of the way. The attacks petered out during the rainy season.
See also: out, peter

rob Peter to pay Paul

to borrow money from someone in order to give to someone else the money that you already owe them Then I'd take out another loan to pay my debts, robbing Peter to pay Paul.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

Pete

peter out

Dwindle or diminish and come to an end, as in Their enthusiasm soon petered out. The origin of this usage is unknown, but one authority suggests it may refer to the apostle Peter, whose enthusiastic support of Jesus quickly diminished so that he denied knowing him three times during the night after Jesus's arrest. [Mid-1800s]
See also: out, peter

rob Peter to pay Paul

Take from one to give to another, shift resources. For example, They took out a second mortgage on their house so they could buy a condo in Florida-they're robbing Peter to pay Paul . Although legend has it that this expression alludes to appropriating the estates of St. Peter's Church, in Westminster, London, to pay for the repairs of St. Paul's Cathedral in the 1800s, the saying first appeared in a work by John Wycliffe about 1382.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

peter out

v.
1. To cause someone to lose all energy; tire someone out: That long run petered me out. You'll get petered out if you work too fast.
2. To lose all energy; tire out: I petered out toward the end and lost the race.
3. To diminish slowly and come to an end; dwindle: The flow of water petered out as the valves were closed.
See also: out, peter

peter

n. the penis. Stop scratching your peter in public!

Peter Jay

n. a nickname for a police officer. You walk straight, or Peter Jay is going to bust you.
See also: jay, peter

peter out

in. to give out; to wear out. What’ll we do when the money peters out?
See also: out, peter

rob Peter to pay Paul

To incur a debt in order to pay off another debt.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

rob Peter to pay Paul

Use funds from one source to repay a debt. If you use one credit card to pay off another, even if you're benefiting by buying time, you're robbing Peter to pay Paul. How the phrase came to be associated with what would seem to be the two apostles is a mystery, since neither was associated with precarious financial planning.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob
References in classic literature ?
I had never seen anyone eat so many melons as Peter ate.
When we got up to go, Peter looked about in perplexity for something that would entertain us.
McGREGOR was quite sure that Peter was somewhere in the toolshed, perhaps hidden underneath a flower-pot.
Peter asked her the way to the gate, but she had such a large pea in her mouth that she could not answer.
This old paternal edifice, needy as he was, and though, being centrally situated on the principal street of the town, it would have brought him a handsome sum, the sagacious Peter had his own reasons for never parting with, either by auction or private sale.
Here then in his kitchen, the only room where a spark of fire took off the chill of a November evening, poor Peter Goldthwaite had just been visited by his rich old partner.
Tis true, 'said Peter,' I'm alive: I keep my station in the world: Once in the week I just contrive To get my whiskers oiled and curled.
One of these windows was turned towards the high road, and when the light burned in it at night the folk used to point it out to each other and wonder what Black Peter was doing in there.
She was already sure that he must be Peter, but it did seem a comparatively short name.
Well, Peter Pan got out by the window, which had no bars.
When the little man had left the apartment Peter of Colfax summoned his squire whom he had send to him at once one of his faithful henchmen.
You may safely trust my man Peter to wait on you, Mr.
That sounds fine," said Peter, hitching his chair a little nearer Felicity's.
The secretary was inclined to take the affair as a practical joke, but Peter Winn, after an examination of the pigeon, thought otherwise.
The face of Peter Ivanovitch expressed a meditative seriousness.