perpetrate

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perpetrate

(ˈpɚpətret)
in. to pose; to pretend. Look at her clothes. Have you ever seen anyone perpetrate like that?
References in periodicals archive ?
The father-of-two referred himself to South Tyneside Domestic Abuse Perpetrator Programme (STDAPP) after being removed from the family home and not allowed access to his two young daughters.
We are most often aware of domestic violence when a perpetrator has become physically violent but, it does not always include physical abuse.
Homicides committed by patients with mental illness have received much media attention, but patients' risk of being victims of homicide and their relationship to the perpetrators has rarely been examined.
The perpetrator stole the digger from a construction site on Piale Pasha Avenue, drove to Artemidos where he ripped the pay machine out of the ground.
One would address eyewitness misidentifications, which often begin when a crime victim is asked to pick a perpetrator out of a series of photographs or a row of people.
The fact that significant harm will take place if the perpetrator re-offends is generally not disputed given the emotional/psychological harm caused, as well as the index offence, usually containing physical or sexual assault.
The captive sees the perpetrator as showing some degree of
For example, if the perpetrator took great care to hide his or her identity from the victim--say, by wearing a mask or using gloves--a profiler may use those details to deduce that that the perpetrator was especially concerned about later identification and apprehension, making him or her more likely to be deterred by security measures.
What he's faced with is insanity," Browne says about the perpetrator.
The perpetrator tells himself that his employer "owes him something.
It's the instant, too, when the perpetrators realize they have become the victims of society.
Wiener draws attention to an important tension between an increasing desire to hold perpetrators responsible and a concern about subjecting them to overly-harsh penalties.
Cases in which we do not punish harmful actions because we don't assign moral responsibility to the perpetrator happen to be just the kinds of cases in which punishment cannot deter similar acts: when the harm was accidental, or when the perpetrator is too young or too mentally ill to be deterred by the threat of punishment.
In more than half of all the cases (51%) two to five parties were involved in the fraud, compared with only one in three cases carried out solely by the perpetrator.
He was sentenced to life imprisonment, the same punishment the perpetrator of the Ormskirk murder could receive.