per


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as per

In accordance with. Charlie stood me up tonight, as per usual. Please pay your rent on time, as per the terms of the lease.
See also: per

as per usual

As typically happens; as is usually the case. As per usual, my boyfriend didn't call me like he said he would. I'll be eating lunch outside on the picnic table, as per usual.
See also: per, usual

per capita

By, of, or for each person in a given population. The government spends more per capita on healthcare than any other country in the world. Though the nation is tiny, it has the highest per capita income in all of Europe.
See also: per

*(big) head

a hangover. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) Oh, man, that booze gave me a big head! Tom has a head this morning and won't be coming into work.

(a) head

 and per head
[for] a person; [for] an individual. How much do you charge per head for dinner? It costs four dollars a head.

a/per ˈhead

for each person: The meal shouldn’t cost more than $30 a head.
See also: head, per

a/one hundred per ˈcent

completely: I agree with you one hundred per cent.
See also: cent, hundred, one, per

as per something

following something that has been decided: The work was carried out as per instructions.
See also: per, something

as per ˈusual/ˈnormal

(spoken) in the usual or normal manner: ‘What time is the lesson?’ ‘Thursday at 3 o’clock, as per usual.’‘Is he in a bad mood this morning?’ ‘Yes, as per normal.’
See also: normal, per, usual

head

1. n. a headache. Music that loud gives me a head.
2. and a head n. a hangover. (Always with a in this sense.) How do you get rid of a head so you can go to work?
3. n. a toilet; a restroom. (Originally nautical. Usually with the.) Ralph is in the head. He’ll be back in a minute.
4. n. a member of the drug culture; a hippie or a person who drops out of mainstream society because of drug use. (From the 1960s and 1970s.) You still see a few heads around, even today.
5. n. a smart person; an intellectual person. I’m no head, but I am sure you made a mistake in your addition.
References in classic literature ?
The others have less than one telephone per hundred.
You could draw my pension, and repay yourselves at the rate, say, of L500 a year, taking your five per cent interest as well.
and the Directors have every reason to believe that ten per cent.
Over fifty per cent are thralls by virtue of the fact that they are merely tenants or are mortgaged.
The purse'll be sixty-five per cent of the gate receipts.
What will sixty-five per cent of the gate receipts be?
If the shot should preserve continuously its initial velocity of 12,000 yards per second, it would require little more than nine hours to reach its destination; but, inasmuch as that initial velocity will be continually decreasing, it will occupy 300,000 seconds, that is 83hrs.
The projectile ought to be propelled with an initial velocity of 12,000 yards per second.
a book] O per se, O; Demogorgon; Belcher, and Mephistophilis!
During her first year in the store, Dulcie was paid five dollars per week.
And it won't run to more than twenty-five yards of fagots per acre, and he's giving me at the rate of seventy roubles the acre.
Why, those first ragged Slavs in their first little deals with us only made something like two and three thousand per cent.
Upon this, the parish authorities magnanimously and humanely resolved, that Oliver should be 'farmed,' or, in other words, that he should be dispatched to a branch-workhouse some three miles off, where twenty or thirty other juvenile offenders against the poor-laws, rolled about the floor all day, without the inconvenience of too much food or too much clothing, under the parental superintendence of an elderly female, who received the culprits at and for the consideration of sevenpence-halfpenny per small head per week.
These, in the days of their abundance, ever regarded gold as dross, and have not yet got over that only impediment in the way of their amassing wealth, but they want no dross from Nicodemus Boffin, Esquire; No, Mr Boffin; the world may term it pride, paltry pride if you will, but they wouldn't take it if you offered it; a loan, sir--for fourteen weeks to the day, interest calculated at the rate of five per cent per annum, to be bestowed upon any charitable institution you may name--is all they want of you, and if you have the meanness to refuse it, count on being despised by these great spirits.
But, unwilling to abandon the scheme altogether, he determined to ask his uncle Glegg to venture twenty pounds, on condition of receiving five per cent.