peep

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Related to peeped: at least, touch base, peeped out

not a peep from/out of (someone)

Not a single word or sound from someone. Amy: "Hi Samantha, thank you for watching the kids for us. How were they?" Samantha: "They were great. I put them to bed at 8, and there hasn't been a peep out of them since!" There wasn't a peep from the students for the rest of the class after I sent Jonathan to detention.
See also: not, of, out, peep

pixel peep

slang To very carefully inspect, scrutinize, and correct the resolution, clarity, and quality of digital images or photographs. When I started getting into digital photography, I'll admit that I that I focused a bit too much on pixel peeping for a while. Later on though, I became less obsessive over technical quality and learned to appreciate well-composed photographs.
See also: peep, pixel

pixel peeping

slang The act, habit, or practice of being particularly or overly critical of or sensitive to the resolution, clarity, and quality of digital images or photographs. When I started getting into digital photography, I'll admit that I that I focused a bit too much on pixel peeping for a while. Later on though, I became less obsessive over technical quality and learned to appreciate well-composed photographs in their own right.
See also: peep, pixel

peeping Tom

A man who secretly observes women undressing or engaging in sexual intercourse. Unless you want to be a target for peeping Toms, you better get curtains for your bedroom windows soon.
See also: peep, tom

hear a peep out of someone

Fig. to get some sort of a response from someone; to hear the smallest word from someone. (Usually in the negative.) I don't want to hear another peep out of you. I didn't know they were there. I didn't hear a peep out of them.
See also: hear, of, out, peep

*peep

a quick look at someone or something. (*Typically: have ~; take ~.) Have a peep into the refrigerator and see if we need any milk. I took a peep at the comet through the telescope.

peep at someone or something

to get a glimpse of someone or something, as if looking through a hole. I peeped at Tom through the Venetian blinds. Look in the microscope and peep at this bacterium.
See also: peep

peep in(to something)

to get a quick look into something, as through a hole in the wall or something similar. I peeped into the oven to see what was cooking for dinner. She opened the oven door and peeped in.
See also: peep

peep out (of something) (at someone or something)

to sneak a glimpse of someone or something out of something, as through a hole. A little mouse peeped out of its hole at the bright lights in the room. Johnny, hiding in the closet, peeped out at the guests through the partly opened door.
See also: out, peep

peep over something

to raise up and sneak a glance over some barrier; to look over the top of something. The child peeped over the wall to get a look at the yard next door. Grandfather peeped over his glasses to look at the television set for a moment.
See also: peep

peep through something

to take a quick glance through something, such as a hole, telescope, etc. Sam peeped through the keyhole and saw that the room was dark. Peep through the telescope and have a look at the moon!
See also: peep

peep under something

to take a quick little glance under something. Would you please peep under the table and see if my shoes are there? Dave peeped under the bed, looking for the cat.
See also: peep

a peeping Tom

a man who secretly watches women while they are taking their clothes off or having sex I always close the curtains in case there are any peeping Toms across the road.
See also: peep, tom

hear a peep out of

Hear the slightest noise from, as in I don't want to hear another peep out of those children. This expression is often used negatively, as in I didn't hear another peep out of them. [c. 1900]
See also: hear, of, out, peep

peeping Tom

A person who secretly watches others, especially for sexual gratification; a voyeur. For example, The police caught a peeping Tom right outside their house. This expression, first recorded in 1796, alludes to the legend of the tailor Tom, the only person to watch the naked Lady Godiva as she rode by and who was struck blind for this sin.
See also: peep, tom

peep out

v.
1. To become partially visible behind a cover or obstacle: The moon peeped out from behind the clouds.
2. To give a quick look from behind a cover or obstacle: The child peeped out at us from behind the door.
See also: out, peep

another peep (out of you)

n. another complaint, word, or sound from someone. (Usually in the negative.) I don’t want to hear another peep out of you!
See also: another, of, out, peep

another peep

verb
See also: another, peep

peep

1. n. a noise; an utterance. I don’t want to hear another peep out of you.
2. n. people. (Often plural, peeps.) How many peeps were there?

peep show

A short soft-core porn exhibition. To enjoy “forbidden” glimpses of naked female flesh, a man went to an arcade in a sleazy neighborhood, paid his dime or quarter, entered a booth, and stared through a peep hole at a partially or fully unclothed woman. The “show,” which lasted for no more than five or ten minutes, began when a shade or other obstruction over the peep hole was raised and ended when it was lowered. Instead of “live models,” some peep shows featured short films shown on individual viewing machines. Peep shows became less and less commercially viable as movie houses (and now the Internet) showed more explicit fare.
See also: peep, show
References in classic literature ?
He peeped through the hinges of the half-open bedroom door.
I crept down the passage as noiselessly as I could and peeped round the corner of the door.
Then the smell of the sausages reached the wolf, and he sniffed and peeped down, and at last stretched out his neck so far that he could no longer keep his footing and began to slip, and slipped down from the roof straight into the great trough, and was drowned.
So cautiously he made his way through the thickets whence the voices came, and, pushing aside the leaves, peeped into the little open space where the two men, staff in hand, were coming slowly together.
For fifty years they had peeped through that little window and across that trim garden, but never yet had such a sight as this come to confound them.
All day I have waited to hear from him, for he often likes to be alone; but an hour ago I feared that something was amiss, so I went up and peeped through the key-hole.
The children danced about with their beautiful playthings; no one looked at the Tree except the old nurse, who peeped between the branches; but it was only to see if there was a fig or an apple left that had been forgotten.