peanuts


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

peanuts

n. practically no money at all; chicken feed. They want me to do everything, but they only pay peanuts.
See also: peanut
References in periodicals archive ?
As defined by the FDA's Standard of Identity, peanut butter must contain at least 90 percent peanuts with no more than 10 percent by weight of seasonings and stabilizing ingredients.
Considering that any product labeled as peanut butter must legally contain 90 percent peanuts in the ingredients, that's not actually all that surprising.
A report aired by a private TV channel, Though peanuts remained favourite dry fruit for entertainment during gossiping, around sessions or watching TV in chilly evenings shopkeeper earning more money in winter season from peanut.
Eating nuts, particularly peanuts, is good for the heart and longevity, according to a study published in JAMA (2015) that found an association between nut and peanut consumption and decreased overall and cardiovascular disease mortality in several ethnic groups and among those from low socioeconomic groups, notable because of peanuts' affordability.
A peanut vendor Hamid Khan, said people crave hot and spicy peanuts in the cold weather and since their price is economical the demand is high.
Nuts, including peanuts (which are technically legumes), have been associated with lower risk of heart disease, cancer and premature death.
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has published new guidelines to help pediatricians and parents know how and when to safely introduce infants to peanuts.
Introducing peanut foods to children who are at different levels of risk for peanut allergies may prevent or mitigate the risk, and the strategies for clinicians are explained in new addendum guidelines issued by an expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
When the moneymaking part of the plant is underground, it can be hard to know when the peanuts are ready for harvest.
Since 1990, worldwide consumption of peanuts has nearly doubled, from 22 million to 40 million metric tonnes.
The results of the present study indicate that early introduction of peanuts significantly decreased the incidence of peanut allergy and modulated immune responses to peanuts in children at high risk for peanut allergy.
The LEAP study randomized 640 high-risk infants to either avoid peanuts or consume at least 6 grams per week of the allergen in foods such as smooth peanut butter mixed with mashed fruit, peanut soup, and ground peanuts in other foods.
Most parents used Bamba, a snack food made of peanuts and puffed corn.
Infants getting small but regular doses of peanut butter are less likely to develop an allergy to peanuts than are similar babies who avoid peanuts altogether, a new study shows.
HOUSTON--The introduction of peanuts at an early age to children who are more highly predisposed to having a peanut allergy can induce tolerance to peanuts and thereby significantly decrease the likelihood of developing a sustained allergy.