peace


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Related to peace: Peace of God, Peace Corps

smoke the peace pipe (with someone)

To reach an agreement or understanding (with someone); to resolve a dispute or stop fighting (with someone). Alludes to the calumet used by certain Native American tribes for ceremonial purposes, such as a covenant or peace treaty. In a surprise turn of events, it seems that the environmentalist group is looking to smoke the peace pipe with the largest lobbying body of the oil industry. I don't understand why there has been so much tension between you. You need to both sit down like rational adults, smoke the peace pipe together, and get on with your lives.
See also: peace, pipe, smoke

peace offering

An item or gesture extended to another person to express remorse or forgiveness. After they had their first big argument, Mark brought Monica a box of her favorite chocolate as a peace offering.
See also: offering, peace

at peace

1. Calm and serene. My daughter was miserable all week, but she's at peace now that her tests are over.
2. Not at war. It is a great relief to know that those two warring factions are at peace.
3. Said of one who has died. Aunt Margaret suffered through a long illness. At least she is at peace now.
See also: peace

at peace with

Calm and comfortable with something, often something that was once displeasing. I was initially disappointed to give up my career as an actor, but I'm at peace with it now.
See also: peace

be at peace with the world

To feel an overall sense of happiness and contentment. I was at peace with the world as I stared down at my infant daughter's sweet face. I hate running, but Matt is at peace with the world when he's jogging through the woods.
See also: peace, world

at peace

 
1. relaxed and happy. I am always at peace when I sit in my rocking chair. When the warm breeze is blowing, I am at peace.
2. Euph. dead. It was a long illness, but she is at peace now. At last, Uncle George is at peace.
See also: peace

hold one's peace

to remain silent. Bill was unable to hold his peace any longer. "Don't do it!" he cried. Quiet, John. Hold your peace for a little while longer.
See also: hold, peace

If you want peace, (you must) prepare for war.

Prov. If a country is well armed, its opponents will be less likely to attack it. Wilbur was always arguing with those of his friends who believed in disarmament. "Getting rid of our weapons won't promote peace," he would say. "If you want peace, you must prepare for war."
See also: if, prepare, want, war

leave someone in peace

to stop bothering someone; to go away and leave someone alone. (Does not necessarily mean to go away from a person.) Please go—leave me in peace. Can't you see that you're upsetting her? Leave her in peace.
See also: leave, peace

peace of mind

Fig. a tranquility that results from not having worries, guilt, or problems. If peace of mind is more important to you than earning a lot of money, maybe you should consider teaching.
See also: mind, of, peace

rest in peace

to lie dead peacefully for eternity. (A solemn entreaty used in funeral prayers, eulogies, etc.) We prayed that the deceased would rest in peace. The bodies of the soldiers will rest in peace.
See also: peace, rest

at peace with something/yourself

feeling calm and relaxed about something or yourself He appears to be at peace with the world these days. These are good times for Randy, a man at peace with himself and his career.
See also: peace

keep the peace

(slightly formal)
to prevent fighting or difficulties The judge made her sign an agreement promising she would try to keep the peace with her husband for one year. Troops were sent in to keep the peace in the region.
See also: keep, peace

leave somebody/something in peace

to let someone or something stay as they are He's hoping everyone will leave him in peace so he can work on his paintings. She thinks the wreck should be left in peace as a memorial.
See also: leave, peace

make your peace with somebody

to stop arguing with someone Melanie knew she had to go back into the house and make her peace with her parents.
See also: make, peace

make your peace with something

to accept something He knows that he's really too old to play ball, and he's made his peace with that.
See also: make, peace

peace of mind

a feeling of calm or not being worried Worries disturbed my peace of mind enough to keep me from falling asleep.
See also: mind, of, peace

rest in peace

to be free from trouble The late Mr. Aspin, may he rest in peace, was a good friend to all of us. The girl is dead. Why can't you stop criticizing and let her rest in peace?
Usage notes: always used in reference to a dead person
See also: peace, rest

a peace offering

something that you give to someone to show that you are sorry or that you want to be friendly, especially after you have argued with them I took Beth some flowers as a peace offering.
See also: offering, peace

be at peace with the world

to be feeling calm and happy because you are satisfied with your life Sitting on the terrace, looking out over the olive groves, she felt at peace with the world.
See There's no peace for the wicked!
See also: peace, world

There's no peace/rest for the wicked!

  (humorous)
something that you say which means you must continue an activity although you might like to stop I can't talk - I've got to finish this essay. There's no rest for the wicked.
See also: peace

at peace

In a state of agreement or friendliness, not at strife or war; also, in a state of inner harmony or quiet. For example, Whatever their disagreements, Mexico and Belize have remained at peace, or In his last illness he seemed finally to be at peace with himself. [1300s]
See also: peace

hold one's peace

see under hold one's tongue.
See also: hold, peace

hold one's tongue

Also, hold or keep one's peace . Keep quiet, remain silent, as in If you don't hold your tongue you'll have to go outside, or Jenny kept her peace about the wedding. The idiom with tongue uses hold in the sense of "restrain," while the others use hold and keep in the sense of "preserve." Chaucer used the first idiom in The Tale of Melibus (c. 1387): "Thee is better hold thy tongue still, than for to speak." The variant appears in the traditional wedding service, telling anyone who knows that a marriage should not take place to "speak now or forever hold your peace." [First half of 1300s] Also see keep quiet.
See also: hold, tongue

keep the peace

Maintain public order; prevent strife. For example, President Clinton ordered troops to Bosnia to keep the peace. This expression dates from the 1400s and was originally used more in the first sense, that is, of police keeping public order. It gained extra currency in the second half of the 1900s when military forces were sent to diverse places-Lebanon, Haiti, Bosnia-to stop warring factions.
See also: keep, peace

leave someone in peace

Avoid disturbing or bothering someone, as in It's best to leave Dean in peace when he's paying the bills. This expression uses peace in the sense of "undisturbed," a usage dating from the early 1200s. Also see leave one alone; let be.
See also: leave, peace

make one's peace with

Reconcile oneself to, bring about friendly relations with, as in He's repented and made his peace with God. This expression was first recorded about 1315. Also see make peace.
See also: make, peace

make peace

Bring about friendly relations or a state of amity; end hostilities. For example, The United Nations sent a task force to make peace between the two warring factions, or Mom was good at making peace among the children. [Mid-1100s] Also see make one's peace with.
See also: make, peace

peace and quiet

Tranquillity and freedom from disturbance. This phrase's redundancy- quiet here does not mean "lack of sound" but "peacefulness"-gives added emphasis. It often is used in wishes for this condition, as in All I want is a little peace and quiet. [Mid-1800s]
See also: and, peace, quiet

peace out

in. to depart; to leave. Let’s peace out. It’s too hot in here.
See also: out, peace

make (one's) peace with

To bring oneself to accept; reconcile oneself to.
See also: make, peace

at peace

1. In a state of tranquility; serene: She is at peace with herself and her friends.
2. Free from strife: Everyone wants to live in a world at peace.
See also: peace

keep the peace

To maintain or observe law and order: officers who were sworn to keep the peace.
See also: keep, peace

peace out

Slang
Used to express "goodbye."
See also: out, peace
References in classic literature ?
Greatly instructed I shall hence depart, Greatly in peace of thought, and have my fill Of knowledge, what this vessel can containe; Beyond which was my folly to aspire.
Yes, I know you have made peace with the Turks without obtaining Moldavia and Wallachia; I would have given your sovereign those provinces as I gave him Finland.
The Turks will be of no use to you; they are worth nothing and have shown it by making peace with you.
I will have my own way, but I'll keep the peace, if possible, and confess the joke when my experiment has succeeded," he said to himself, looking very much like a mischievous boy, as he went on with his innocent prescriptions.
Rose was playing softly on the small organ that stood in the upper hall, so that Aunt Peace could enjoy it; and all the while he talked with the old ladies, Uncle Alec was listening to the fitful music of the child, and thinking of another Rose who used to play for him.
By others it is thought that he lived to return to Scotland, and that the Queen gave to him one of the now many vacant Church livings, and that there he spent his last days in quietness and peace.
In matters of high importance, particularly in cases relating to the game, the justice was not always attentive to these admonitions of his clerk; for, indeed, in executing the laws under that head, many justices of peace suppose they have a large discretionary power, by virtue of which, under the notion of searching for and taking away engines for the destruction of the game, they often commit trespasses, and sometimes felony, at their pleasure.
The squire, therefore, putting on a most wise and significant countenance, after a preface of several hums and hahs, told his sister, that upon more mature deliberation, he was of opinion, that "as there was no breaking up of the peace, such as the law," says he, "calls breaking open a door, or breaking a hedge, or breaking a head, or any such sort of breaking, the matter did not amount to a felonious kind of a thing, nor trespasses, nor damages, and, therefore, there was no punishment in the law for it.
Mrs Western said, "she knew the law much better; that she had known servants very severely punished for affronting their masters;" and then named a certain justice of the peace in London, "who," she said, "would commit a servant to Bridewell at any time when a master or mistress desired it.
The justice of the peace is over thirty miles from me.
Sponsors of the Youth Peace Fest included Youth Peace Foundation, the Times Foundation of India, The Prem Rawat Foundation (TPRF) and Rotary International.
People from different walks of life, including tribal elders, members of peace committees, and representatives of political and religious parties, peace activists and senior officials of the administration were in attendance.
This year "Day of Peace" will be observed under the theme of "Education for Peace" to enhance the need for peace by pursuing education.
After our decisions were made we made gingerbread feet and doves to represent us stepping into peace together and as an international peace sign.
In all, we are dedicating all our games this September for peace," Azkals Team Manager Dan Palami said in a TV interview.
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