pay (something) back

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pay (something) back

To repay an amount of money that was borrowed. If you fail to pay your loan back in the minimum monthly installments, the bank will start charging exorbitant fees.
See also: back, pay

pay someone back

 
1. . Lit. to return money that was borrowed from a person. You owe me money. When are you going to pay me back? You must pay John back. You have owed him money for a long time. You have to pay back everyone you owe money to.
2. Fig. to get even with someone [for doing something]. I will pay her back for what she said about me. Fred eventually will pay Mike back. He bears grudges for a long time. He intends to pay back everyone who has wronged him!
See also: back, pay

pay something back (to someone)

to repay someone. I paid the money back to Jerry. Can I pay back the money to George now? Please pay the money back now.
See also: back, pay

pay back

1. Repay a debt or a loan, as in I'll pay you back next month.
2. Also, pay back in someone's own coin. Revenge oneself, repay in kind, as in He thought he could get away with copying my plans, but I'll pay him back in his own coin . This expression refers to repaying a debt in exactly the same currency in which the money had been lent. [c. 1600]
See also: back, pay

pay back

v.
1. To return some amount of money that has been borrowed: Will you pay back the $60 I gave you last month? They finally paid the money back.
2. To repay someone an amount of money: I might not have enough money to pay them back. We need to pay back the bank.
3. To reward or punish someone for something: After all their hard work, the team was paid back with a victory. After they beat us, we paid them back by winning the series.
See also: back, pay
References in periodicals archive ?
Williams, who started rapping in the area when he was 7 years old, said he wanted to pay something back after winning attention for his musical talents with a regional Emmy award.
Chris said: "I left the Army 14 years ago and I have always wanted to pay something back.
Ms Chick's daughter, Louise Gregson-Oldfield, died after being hit by a bus in March 2001 and she wanted to pay something back to the community that supported her through the aftermath of that tragedy adding: "we can't be beaten by vandals.
You may be a hardworking man but you have been a fraudulent man working for yourself and now you have to pay something back to society.
What Damian was saying, what I believe, is that if we have to fund higher education, and if people who get university degrees go on to earn well, which is good, they should pay something back and that's what the current system does.
Keen to pay something back, the Mod-lover set about arranging fundraising music gigs.
Comparisons have been made to bailing out the banks, a bit too simplistic, but I think it is time to stand up for what the North-east has done for the rest of the country and pay something back
We need to try and get back some of confidence, we must pay something back to everyone associated with Sligo football.
So isn't it time such celebrities, having gained from the BBC training and background, had a responsibility when they move channels for higher fees to pay something back to the Beeb and the taxpayer?
He said: "Everyone should pay something back for the next generation of kids.
Although legally covered to keep the money, committee members felt the council may have a moral obligation to pay something back.
I work at the University Hospital of Wales as a nurse and decided to join the TA to pay something back to society," said Cpt Lewis, pictured left.
As well as allowing offenders to pay something back to the community, it also helps offenders to develop skills they can use in the future which will prevent them continuing in a cycle of crime.
Gordon believes it''s in everyone''s best interests if the prisoners pay something back into the system by working, especially if it gives them the chance to gain a nationally recognised qualification and make them more employable on their release.
Gordon believes it's in everyone's best interests if the prisoners pay something back into the system by working, especially if it gives them the chance to gain a nationally recognised qualification and make them more employable on their release.