pay lip service

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Related to pay lip service: lateral thinker

pay lip service (to something)

Fig. to express loyalty, respect, or support for something insincerely. You don't really care about politics. You're just paying lip service to the candidate. Don't sit here and pay lip service. Get busy!
See also: lip, pay, service
References in periodicals archive ?
Most farmers pay lip service to animal welfare, the transport of live animals is a national disgrace, which the farming unions turn a blind eye to.
Murray is rather dismissive of OEMs in their attempts to shed weight, saying, "Until now, car companies tend to pay lip service.
More people pay lip service to the importance of intellectual property (IP) than understand how to profit from innovative ideas.
The question divides the city's intelligentsia between those who believe engagement with foreign architects is a necessary part of the country's cultural evolution and those who condemn successive leaders for spending too much on ego-driven architects who at best pay lip service to Chinese sensibilities.
many of them just pay lip service to using recycled materials.
The sorry fact is that while Martin and some of the provincial premiers still pay lip service to the Christian faith, not one of them is willing to follow the example set by President Bush in upholding the sanctity of human life and the fundamental importance of marriage between a man and a woman.
Policymakers in Japan and abroad pay lip service to the idea of reform but fear the very change that will cause reform to happen.
Jurisdictions that put these in have to do more than pay lip service to traffic safety.
But regardless of the motives behind Trustworthy Computing, Microsoft must do more then just pay lip service to the security of its products.
Lots of our movies and Mother's Day homilies romanticize and pay lip service to the vocation of caring for and raising our children, and we all agree that this is the most critical task of any civilization.
As I consider this press conference, I find it both dispiriting and disquieting to discover that public officials still feel they must pay lip service to a god while celebrating a scientific achievement.
The public, yes: We all pay lip service to that vast faceless beast, whose pale visage is usually (if faintly) discerned in public opinion polls.
And we (nearly) all pay lip service to the theory of American democracy, its free ins titutions, and its free market cornucopia.
still pay lip service to the idea of freedom of speech and expression, but who insist these freedoms should not have government support.
In general, politicians pay lip service to right-wing radicalism and xenophobic violence.