pawn off


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pawn (something) off (on one) (as something else)

To discard something unwanted by giving or selling it to one (under the pretense of it being something else). There are always guys pawning off cheap watches as Rolexes in this part of town. She tried to pawn off the crummy assignment on me as some kind of special challenge.
See also: off, pawn, something

pawn someone or something off

(on someone) (as someone or something) Go to palm someone or something off (on someone) (as someone or something).
See also: off, pawn

pawn off

Dispose of by deception, as in They tried to pawn off a rebuilt computer as new. This expression may have originated as a corruption of palm off, although it was also put as pawn upon in the 1700s, when it originated.
See also: off, pawn

pawn off

v.
To get rid of or dispose of something deceptively by misrepresenting its true value: The clerk tried to pawn off the fake gemstone as a diamond. They almost pawned the counterfeit bills off on unsuspecting tourists.
See also: off, pawn
References in periodicals archive ?
Were we going to pawn off elbow grease to the nanomachines.
how quickly i pawn off this body, hand it to a man with a raw of gold teeth in exchange for a string of airy bones glittering, weightless, luminescent.
Sloan continued, "The Senate tried to pawn off this ban to an American public fed up with congressional inaction and secrecy as real change.
As well as losing their homes it now appears the minister wants couples to pawn off the wedding bands that symbolise their union.
Former Superintendent Ramon Cortines had tried to pawn off a 1.
All such hopes fade as he attempts to pawn off a parade of small-town types, including the handsome jock Pete (Affleck), the anarchist-in-training Ely (Ricci), the geeky outsider Sandy (Sara Gilbert), the rich-bitch starlet Skye (Kate Hudson), the chubby tagalong (Ethan Suplee) and the nice-guy dreamer (Sexton).
BAPS:'' Astonishingly demeaning non-comedy - less because director Robert Townsend turned Halle Berry and Natalie Desselle into sub-minstrel show grotesques than because he tried to pawn off kindergarten-grade writing as social satire.