pavement


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hit the pavement

1. To walk outside, especially on the streets or sidewalk. I need to get out, hit the pavement, and start looking for a job.
2. To begin or take part in a strike. The workers hit the pavement again after the company implemented a unilateral pay cut to all employees.
See also: hit, pavement

hit the bricks

 and hit the pavement 
1. Fig. Inf. to start walking; to go into the streets. I have a long way to go. I'd better hit the bricks. Go on! Hit the pavement! Get going!
2. Inf. Fig. to go out on strike. The workers hit the pavement on Friday and haven't been back on the job since. Agree to our demands, or we hit the bricks.
See also: brick, hit

pound the pavement

Fig. to walk through the streets looking for a job. I spent two months pounding the pavement after the factory I worked for dosed. Hey, Bob. You'd better get busy pounding those nails unless you want to be out pounding the pavement.
See also: pavement, pound

pound the pavement

1. to look for a job Mary had children to feed, so she kept pounding the pavement until she finally landed a job at a burger restaurant.
2. to look for money or support She's been going out and pounding the pavement, raising money for research. Day after day, they pound the pavement, hoping to share a message about their religious faith.
See also: pavement, pound

hit the bricks

Go out on strike, as in The union voted to hit the bricks as soon as their contract expired. [Slang; 1940s]
See also: brick, hit

pound the pavement

Walk the streets, especially in search of employment. For example, He was fired last year and he's been pounding the pavement ever since. A similar usage is pound a beat, meaning "to walk a particular route over and over"; it is nearly always applied to a police officer. [Early 1900s]
See also: pavement, pound

hit the bricks

and hit the pavement
1. tv. to start walking; to go into the streets. I have a long way to go. I’d better hit the bricks.
2. tv. to go out on strike. The workers hit the pavement on Friday and haven’t been back on the job since.
See also: brick, hit

hit the pavement

verb
See also: hit, pavement

hit the bricks

Slang
To go on strike.
See also: brick, hit

pound the pavement

Slang
To travel the streets on foot, especially in search of work.
See also: pavement, pound
References in classic literature ?
Now there was a trap door {169} on the wall, while at one end of the pavement {170} there was an exit leading to a narrow passage, and this exit was closed by a well-made door.
He had been forced to accomplish it, however, by bending very low at each street intersection in repeated attention to his sandal wrappings, bringing his nostrils as close to the pavement as possible.
In another block he saw two creatures struggling upon the roof of an adjacent building until finally one of them, wrenching himself free from the grasp of the other, gave his adversary a mighty push which hurled him to the pavement below, where he lay motionless upon the dusty road.
There was not a soul anywhere near him, but by the occasional flashes of light Thomson could see soldiers and hurrying people in the Admiralty Square, and along the Strand he could hear the patter of footsteps upon the pavement.
Outside on the pavement she stood for a moment, looking carefully around.
At the junction of the two thoroughfares she stopped in the thin traffic of the broad pavement and turned to me with an air of challenge.
said Stepan Arkadyevitch to his wife, and glancing at his watch, he made a motion of his hand before his face, indicating a caress to his wife and children, and walked jauntily along the pavement.
Two; four; and two is six,' measuring on the pavement.
The Prince remained on the pavement until after the little brougham had driven away.
The light came to the level of the pavement as he did this, and a man ascended, bearing in his hand a torch.
The question was unexpectedly and suddenly answered for her, by the colourless boy, Bitzer, who came round the corner with such blind speed and so little anticipating a stoppage on the pavement, that he brought himself up against Mr.
As he said it, he rose, shook himself, scratched himself, tied his brown coat loosely round his neck by the sleeves (he had previously used it as a coverlet), and sat down upon the pavement yawning, with his back against the wall opposite to the grating.
A few idle men lounged about the two inns, and the empty market-place, and the tradesmen's doors, and some old people were dozing in chairs outside an alms-house wall; but scarcely any passengers who seemed bent on going anywhere, or to have any object in view, went by; and if perchance some straggler did, his footsteps echoed on the hot bright pavement for minutes afterwards.
He wrote of old church music and the Alban Hills, and of the languor of incense and the charm of the streets by night, in the rain, when the pavements shone and the light of the street lamps was mysterious.
Two or three theatres emptied a crowd upon the storm-swept pavements.