pat

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have (something) off pat

To learn, master, or understand something perfectly, to the point of requiring little or no focus to do, recall, or accomplish it. I know it's a little tricky getting the hang of the machine, but keep at it, and you'll have it off pat in no time. My sister is such a musical prodigy that she can have a song off pat after listening to it only once or twice.
See also: have, off, pat

learn (something) down pat

To learn, master, or understand something perfectly, to the point of requiring little or no focus to do, recall, or accomplish it. I made sure to learn my speech down pat before the ceremony so I wouldn't spend the whole time looking down at piece of paper. My sister is such a musical prodigy that she can learn a song down pat after listening to it only once or twice.
See also: down, learn, pat

off pat

Perfectly; to a point of flawless and effortless execution. (Typically "have or learn something off pat.") I made sure to learn my speech off pat before the ceremony so I wouldn't spend the whole time looking down at piece of paper. My sister is such a musical prodigy that she can have a song off pat after listening to it only once or twice.
See also: off, pat

on (one's) Pat Malone

Without or not near to anyone else; on one's own; all alone. Australian rhyming slang referring to a ballad about an Irishman called Pat Malone, who suffered numerous misfortunes after emigrating to Australia. Primarily heard in Australia. To be quite honest, after a hectic week of work, I much prefer having a drink on my Pat Malone than being around a bunch of people. Mary's been on her Pat Malone ever since Rupert broke up with her last week.
See also: Malone, on, pat

on (one's) pat

Without or not near to anyone else; on one's own; all alone. Shortened from the Australian rhyming slang "on one's Pat Malone," referring to a ballad about an Irishman called Pat Malone, who suffered numerous misfortunes after emigrating to Australia. Primarily heard in Australia. To be quite honest, after a hectic week of work, I much prefer having a drink on my pat than being around a bunch of people. Mary's been on her pat ever since Rupert broke up with her last week.
See also: on, pat

be on (one's) Pat Malone

To be without anyone else; to be on one's own. Australian rhyming slang referring to a ballad about an Irishman (called Pat Malone) who suffered numerous misfortunes after emigrating to Australia. Primarily heard in Australia. To be quite honest, after a hectic week of work, I much prefer being on my Pat Malone than spending the weekend around a bunch of people. Mary's been on her Pat Malone ever since Rupert broke up with her last week.
See also: Malone, on, pat

be on (one's) pat

To be without anyone else; to be on one's own. Shortened from the Australian rhyming slang "to be on one's Pat Malone," which refers to a ballad about an Irishman (called Pat Malone) who suffered numerous misfortunes after emigrating to Australia. Primarily heard in Australia. To be quite honest, after a hectic week of work, I much prefer being on my pat than spending the weekend around a bunch of people. Mary's been on her pat ever since Rupert broke up with her last week.
See also: on, pat

down pat

Learned, mastered, or understood perfectly, to the point of requiring little or no focus to do, recall, or accomplish. Make sure you practice these equations until you have them down pat. I always get my routine down pat so there won't be any room for error during the performance.
See also: down, pat

pat on the back

Praise given to a person for an achievement or a job well done. Treating his daughter to ice cream was Joe's way of giving her a pat on the back after she won first place in the science fair. The only reason she stays late at work is to receive a pat on the back from her boss.
See also: back, on, pat

have calluses from patting one's own back

 and break one's arm patting oneself on the back
Fig. to be a braggart. If you haven't heard about Bill's latest achievement, he'd be glad to tell you. He has calluses from patting his own back. Jane: I did a really wonderful job, if I do say so myself. Tom: If you're not careful, you'll break your arm patting yourself on the back.
See also: back, have, pat

pat answer

a quick, easy answer; a simplified or evasive answer. Don't just give them a pat answer. Give some more explanation and justification. Otherwise you will just end up answering a lot more questions.
See also: answer, pat

pat someone on the back

 and give someone a pat on the back 
1. Lit. to pat someone's back to show praise. The coach patted each player on the back after the game.
2. Fig. to praise someone for something. The teacher patted all the students on the back for their good work. They were patting themselves on the back for winning when the final whistle blew.
See also: back, on, pat

pat someone or something on something

to tap someone or something on a particular place with the open hand. She patted the child on the bottom. I patted the car on its hood to show how proud I was of it.
See also: on, pat

pat something down

to tap something down with the open hand. I heaped some soil over the seeds and patted it down. I patted down the soil.
See also: down, pat

stand pat (on something)

to stick firmly to one's position or opinions. I am going to stand pat on this issue. I thought you would stand pat in the absence of new information.
See also: pat, stand

have something down pat

to learn something so well that you do not have to think about how to do or say it Bud had his answers down pat, but he knew there could be some questions on the test that he hadn't thought of.
See also: down, have, pat

a pat on the back

praise a slap on the back The White House gave her a pat on the back Thursday, when the president said she was a highly valued member of his staff.
Related vocabulary: a kick in the butt
See also: back, on, pat

stand pat

(slightly formal)
to leave something just as it is, without any change While he stood pat, other people found a better way to solve the problem.
See also: pat, stand

learn something off pat

  (British, American & Australian) also learn something down pat (American)
to learn something so well that you do not have to think about how to do or say it All the answers he'd learned off pat for the interview sounded unconvincing now. (British, American & Australian)
See also: learn, off, pat

a pat on the back

if you give someone a pat on the back, you praise them for something good that they have done (often + for ) She deserves a pat on the back for keeping things going while you were away.
See also: back, on, pat

stand pat

  (American informal) also sit pat (Australian informal)
to refuse to make any changes Our advice to investors is, stand pat - the recession will soon be over.
See learn off pat
See also: pat, stand

pat on the back

A word or gesture of support, approval, or praise, as in The bonus she gave her assistant was a pat on the back for doing a good job. [Early 1800s]
See also: back, on, pat

stand pat

Refuse to change one's position or opinion, as in We're going to stand pat on this amendment to the bylaws. This expression may be derived from the verb pat in the sense of "strike firmly and accurately." [Late 1800s]
See also: pat, stand

pat down

v.
1. To flatten or mold something by tapping it gently with the hands or a flat implement: The baker patted down the dough with a rolling pin. We patted the clay down before shaping it.
2. To search someone or something with the hands, especially for weapons or illegal substances: The police patted down the suspect for guns. The customs officials patted us down.
See also: down, pat

stand pat (on something)

in. to stick firmly to one’s position or opinions. I thought you would stand pat in the absence of new information.
See also: on, pat, stand

stand pat

verb
See also: pat, stand

pat on the back

An expression or gesture of praise or approval: Let's give them a pat on the back for doing a good job.
See also: back, on, pat

stand pat

1. To oppose or resist change.
2. Games To play one's poker hand without drawing more cards.
See also: pat, stand