patient


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to patient: Patient Care Technician

Doctors make the worst patients.

It is difficult to give people help or advice on something in which they are professionals, because they often feel as though they already know better than anyone else how to handle the situation or perform a given task. Mary tried to convince her boss at the bank to see a credit advisor about his growing debt, but he kept insisting that he knew how to manage his money. Doctors make the worst patients.
See also: Doctor, make, worst

patient dumping

The premature discharge of patients, especially homeless patients or those with psychological disabilities, onto the streets by hospital workers or care providers, due to the high cost of providing care or shelter for them. A local hospital is being investigated for a continual practice of patient dumping, with many who suffer from chronic addiction and health issues being thrust straight back onto Skid Row.
See also: dump, patient

patient as Griselda

Extremely calm, composed, and dutiful. Griselda is a character in folklore who quietly endures many tests to prove her virtue to her husband. There are a lot of opinionated people in this office, so the next person we hire will need to be as patient as Griselda. My mother raised 10 kids—she is truly as patient as Griselda!
See also: patient

patient of

Able to stay composed when faced with (something unpleasant). My mother is very patient of chaos—I guess she developed that skill while raising five kids. Meditation has helped me to become more patient of everyday annoyances.
See also: of, patient

*patient as Job

very patient. (Alludes to the biblical figure Job.*Also: as ~.) If you want to teach young children, you must be as patient as Job. The director who is working with that temperamental actor must have the patience of Job.
See also: job, patient
References in classic literature ?
He was naturally humane, but possessed of no small share of moral courage; or, in other words, he was chary of the lives of his patients, and never tried uncertain experiments on such members of society as were considered useful; but, once or twice, when a luckless vagrant had come under his care, he was a little addicted to trying the effects of every phial in his saddle-bags on the strangers constitution.
Their reason for choosing so unusual an hour for a consultation was obviously to insure that there should be no other patient in the waiting-room.
Such were the singular circumstances in connection with the Resident Patient and the Brook Street Doctor.
My page who admits patients is a new boy and by no means quick.
It may seem odd that with such pleasant habits he should have been given to the heroic treatment, bleeding and blistering and starving his patients, with a dispassionate disregard to his personal example; but the incongruity favored the opinion of his ability among his patients, who commonly observed that Mr.
A medical man should be responsible for the quality of the drugs consumed by his patients.
Various patients got well while Lydgate was attending them, some even of dangerous illnesses; and it was remarked that the new doctor with his new ways had at least the merit of bringing people back from the brink of death.
After this, it came to be held in various quarters that Lydgate played even with respectable constitutions for his own purposes, and how much more likely that in his flighty experimenting he should make sixes and sevens of hospital patients.
This foreign nobleman of yours is dying to try his quack remedies (mesmerism included) on my patient, and a nurse who is brought here by his wife may be a little too willing to help him.
Rubelle looked very attentively at the patient, curtseyed to Lady Glyde, set one or two little things right in the room, and sat down quietly in a corner to wait until she was wanted.
As soon as he set eyes on his patient I saw his face alter.
The Countess, on her own responsibility, immediately brought him in to see the patient.
After giving us some useful directions about the management of the patient, and mentioning that he would come again in five days' time, the physician withdrew to consult in private with Mr.
Dawson, now that his patient was safe, was less inclined than ever to submit to unprofessional interference, and the Count (I cannot imagine why) lost all the self-control which he had so judiciously preserved on former occasions, and taunted the doctor, over and over again, with his mistake about the fever when it changed to typhus.
In the meanwhile we had the Count to consult in any minor difficulty, and we need not unnecessarily disturb our patient in her present weak and nervous condition by the presence of a stranger at her bedside.
Full browser ?