parting

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come to a parting of the ways

To separate. To leave someone or something behind, often at a dramatic moment. It looks like we have come to a parting of the ways, old friend. I hope your endeavor in the city works out, and I will keep you in my prayers on the farm.
See also: come, of, parting, way

parting shot

A final, usually critical remark made specifically to have an impact on the listener(s). He couldn't resist getting a parting shot in at the hiring manager as he stormed out of her office.
See also: parting, shot

parting of the ways

a point at which people separate and go their own ways. (Often with come to a, arrive at a, reach a, etc.) Jane and Bob finally came to a parting of the ways. Bill and his parents reached a parting of the ways.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways

a separation of two things or people because of a disagreement We came to a parting of the ways because of our different ideas about what should be done to move the company forward.
Related vocabulary: part company (with somebody)
See also: of, parting, way

a parting shot

a remark that you say as you are leaving somewhere so that it has a strong effect Her parting shot was 'I'm going to spend the evening with people who appreciate my company!'
See also: parting, shot

the parting of the ways

the point at which two people or organizations separate The parting of the ways came after a series of disagreements between the manager and the group's singer.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways

A point of divergence, especially an important one, as in When Jim decided to travel with the band and Jill wanted a more normal home life, they came to a parting of the ways . This term, which transfers a fork in a road to alternative courses of action, appears in the Bible (Ezekiel 21:21), where the king of Babylon must decide whether or not to attack Jerusalem: "[He] stood at the parting of the way." [c. 1600]
See also: of, parting, way

parting shot

A final insult or last word in an argument, as in As she stalked out, Jane hurled as a parting shot, " And I quit!" This idiom apparently originated as a corruption of Parthian shot, referring to the practice of ancient Parthian warriors of turning back to shoot at their pursuers. [Late 1800s]
See also: parting, shot

parting shot

n. the last word; a final comment before departing. His parting shot concerned some comments about my ability to do simple math.
See also: parting, shot

parting of the ways

A point of divergence, especially one of great moment.
See also: of, parting, way

parting shot

The last word. At the end of a heated discussion or argument, you unleash a zinger of a remark as you leave. You've just made a parting shot. The phrase is very often said as “Parthian shot.” The Parthians were a Persian tribe that developed the cavalry tactic of retreating in order to draw their enemy after them, whereupon they would turn in the saddle and fire a barrage of arrows. Although some scholars say “parting” came from “Parthian,” others say it's coincidental.
See also: parting, shot
References in classic literature ?
I saw that she was parting in the middle, and that the life of the solitary man upon the mast hung by a thread.
These incidents had made the memory of his last talk with Madame Olenska so vivid to the young man that as the curtain fell on the parting of the two actors his eyes filled with tears, and he stood up to leave the theatre.
But then it was brilliantly new and surprising; it seemed to be the last word that could be said for the truth in fiction; and it had a spell that held us like an anesthetic above the ache of parting, and the anxiety for the years that must pass, with all their redoubled chances, before our home circle could be made whole again.
With the recovery of her customary composure came the unwelcome remembrance of the parting words spoken to her by Montbarry's widow:--'We shall meet again--here in England, or there in Venice where my husband died--and meet for the last time.
My manhood had sustained me through the parting with the mother.
It was an indescribable relief to hear my uncle's hearty voice wishing me a happy life at parting.
My physician having acquainted me (which I take very kindly of him) that I am in danger of leaving you all very shortly, I have determined to say a few words to you at this our parting, before my distemper, which I find grows very fast upon me, puts it out of my power.
Miss Sedley's papa was a merchant in London, and a man of some wealth; whereas Miss Sharp was an articled pupil, for whom Miss Pinkerton had done, as she thought, quite enough, without conferring upon her at parting the high honour of the Dixonary.
Before Vronsky's departure for the elections, Anna had reflected that the scenes constantly repeated between them each time he left home, might only make him cold to her instead of attaching him to her, and resolved to do all she could to control herself so as to bear the parting with composure.
All the strength that was in him he was using to throw off the insidious poison of her parting speech, and it became plainer to him with each succeeding moment that he would have need of strength.
The more carefully I reflected on what had passed between us, the more shrewdly I suspected the production of the casket, and the application for the loan, of having been mere formalities, designed to pave the way for the parting inquiry addressed to me.
After all that we three have suffered together," she said "there can be no parting between us till the last parting of all.
When she came into the ship, I thought she would have died indeed; her heart sank at the sight of me, and at the thoughts of parting with me in that condition, and she cried so intolerably, I could not for a long time have any talk with her.
She shrank back, as Fagin offered to lay his hand on hers, but said good-night again, in a steady voice, and, answering his parting look with a nod of intelligence, closed the door between them.
I remember with devout thankfulness that I can never be much nearer parting company with my readers for ever, than I was then, until there shall be written against my life, the two words with which I have this day closed this book:--THE END.