parrot

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parrot (someone's) words

To repeat verbatim what someone else has said or is saying. When you're teaching students a new language, it does them little good to just have them parrot your words—they have to understand the mechanics of the language itself. The three boys encircled the fourth, parroting his words of protest in mocking tones.
See also: parrot, word

(as) sick as a parrot

Thoroughly displeased, disappointed, or dejected (about something). Primarily heard in UK. Tim was as sick as a parrot when he learned that he had been passed over for the promotion. I'm delighted that my children have such wonderful opportunities abroad, but I must say I feel sick as a parrot at the thought of being separated from them for so long.
See also: parrot, sick

be (as) sick as a parrot

To be thoroughly displeased, disappointed, or dejected (about something). Primarily heard in UK. Tim was as sick as a parrot when he learned that he had been passed over for the promotion. I'm delighted that my children have such wonderful opportunities abroad, but I must say I've been sick as a parrot at the thoughts of being separated from them for so long.
See also: parrot, sick

parrot-fashion

By rote, without knowing or understanding the actual substance of it. You will also be tested on how to apply these rules to real-world scenarios, so don't just learn to recite them parrot-fashion.

parrot fashion

BRITISH
If a child learns something parrot fashion, they learn it by repeating it many times, but they do not really understand what it means. Under the old system pupils often had to repeat lessons parrot fashion. There are no books, pens or chairs here, just a blackboard and a dirt floor where 150 dusty children sit in rows, learning their words parrot fashion. Note: Some parrots are able to imitate human speech, and repeat words and phrases, although they do not really understand what they are saying.
See also: fashion, parrot

sick as a parrot

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you are as sick as a parrot, you are very annoyed or disappointed about something. Sportsnight presenter Des Lynam will be as sick as a parrot if his new TV show fails to score with viewers. Note: The origin of this expression is uncertain. References to people being `as melancholy as a sick parrot' have been found as early as the 17th century. In the 1970s in West Africa, there was an outbreak of the disease of psittacosis or parrot fever, which humans can catch from birds. At about this time, footballers and football managers started using this expression to say how they felt when they had lost a match.
See also: parrot, sick

sick as a parrot

extremely disappointed. humorous
This expression is a late 20th-century British catchphrase, often associated with disappointed footballers or football managers.
1998 New Scientist Many of my MP colleagues are as sick as the proverbial parrot that Lord Sainsbury has been appointed to succeed John Battle as Britain's science minister.
See also: parrot, sick

(learn, repeat, etc. something) ˈparrot-fashion

(British English, disapproving) (learn, repeat, etc. something) without understanding the meaning: When we were at school we used to learn history parrot-fashion; all I can remember now is the dates.
This idiom refer to the fact that parrots can learn phrases and repeat them after you without understanding what they mean.

(as) sick as a ˈparrot

(British English, humorous) very disappointed: She was as sick as a parrot when she found out that her sister had been nominated for a prize and she hadn’t.
See also: parrot, sick
References in classic literature ?
Sire," he replied, "the death of the parrot was nothing.
The Princess was surprised and anxious, and fearing the parrot, who was her greatest comfort, had fallen ill, she took him in her hand and caressed him.
Presently the King appeared, and the parrot noticed with joy how much he was disliked.
The parrot, finding she was not much alarmed, told her who he was, all that her mother had promised him and the help he had already received from a Fairy who had assured him that she would give him means to transport the Princess to her mother's arms.
Since a long time the parrot had been on Felicite's mind, because he came from America, which reminded her of Victor, and she had approached the negro on the subject.
We was all staring at him surprised, especially Uncle Dick Tuxton, whose particular pet the parrot was.
Uncle Dick's fond of the parrot, so he speaks up for him.
When just then the parrot cuts with another of them squawks.
The only human sounds that the Parrot could bawl out were, "Come, let us be men
Spare us your elegiac tones," said the Parrot giggling.
The frightened Canary fluttered about in his cage; the Parrot flapped his wings, and cried, "Come, let us be men
Then she added: 'Sit down,' and composed herself voluptuously, in a nest of crimson and gold cushions, on an ottoman near the parrot.
The parrot had given a most piercing shriek, as if its name were Society and it asserted its right to its exactions.
You could go on Poll Parroting enough with her, when I warn't come in: Poll Parrot a little with her on this pint.
You can Poll Parrot enough when you ain't wanted to Poll Parrot, you perwerse jade