sauce parlor

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Related to parlor: Parlor games

sauce parlor

n. a tavern. I wouldn’t be caught dead in that sauce parlor.
See also: sauce
References in classic literature ?
In the parlor on the other side of the door a man's voice spoke softly and the door opened.
Miss Ophelia, who seldom sat much in Marie's company, followed him into the parlor, having first carefully laid away the paper.
Well, as I was saying about the parlor, there was beautiful curtains on the windows: white, with pictures painted on them of castles with vines all down the walls, and cattle coming down to drink.
When Rowena had at last done all her duty by the people in the parlor, she went upstairs to satisfy the longings of an overflow meeting there, for the parlor was not big enough to hold all the comers.
As they passed the parlor door Miranda thought she heard a crackle and looked in.
One, the door into the front parlor, close at Magdalen's left hand.
Let the student go thither in December, sit down with the teamsters at their meals, share their evening merriment, and repose with them at night when every bed has its three occupants, and parlor, barroom, and kitchen are strewn with slumberers around the fire.
Now and then, however, when Violet and Peony happened to raise their voices, the words were as audible as if they had been spoken in the very parlor where the mother sat.
He killed a couple of battalions of cats (Tangier is full of them) and made a parlor carpet out of their hides.
He left his horse in the yard to avoid making a noise on the gravel in front, and entered the parlor without other notice than the noise of the door-handle.
Following the simple, old-fashioned way in vogue then, Anne went down to the parlor on Gilbert's arm.
My voice had evidently reached the ears of somebody in the back parlor.
A parlor and a kitchen, a smoking-room, a bed-room, and a spare chamber for a friend, all scantily furnished, sufficed for the modest wants of the owner of the property.
Every day she has to scold it, and make it lie down flat on the parlor floor to be walked upon; but sometimes when she goes to market the rug will hump up its back skin, and stand on its four feet, and trot along after her.
Rose sat all alone in the big best parlor, with her little handkerchief laid ready to catch the first tear, for she was thinking of her troubles, and a shower was expected.