paradise

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trouble in paradise

cliché Stress, difficulty, unhappiness, or discontentment in what is thought to be a happy or stable situation, often a marriage or romantic relationship. I think that's David's husband over there flirting with the bartender. Surely there isn't trouble in paradise already? It looks like there might be trouble in paradise for the tech giant, as news is leaking of a major internal power struggle within the company.
See also: paradise, trouble

live in a fool's paradise

To be in a happy state for foolish, unfounded, or delusional reasons. We were living in a fool's paradise thinking that the financial successes of the early 2000s would last forever.
See also: live, paradise

fool's paradise

Fig. a state of being happy for foolish or unfounded reasons. I'm afraid that Sue's marital happiness is a fool's paradise; there are rumors that her husband is unfaithful. Fred is confident that he'll get a big raise this year, but I think he's living in a fool's paradise.
See also: paradise

paradise (on earth)

Fig. a place on earth that is as lovely as paradise. The retirement home was simply a paradise on earth. The beach where we went for our vacation was a paradise.

fool's paradise

State of delusive contentment or false hope. For example, Joan lived in a fool's paradise, looking forward to a promotion she would never get. This expression was first recorded in 1462.
See also: paradise

be living in a fool's paradise

If someone is living in a fool's paradise, they believe wrongly that their situation is good, when really it is not. Anyone who believes that this deal heralds a golden new era for the European air traveller is living in a fool's paradise. Note: You can also use a fool's paradise on its own to mean a situation where someone thinks things are good, but really they are not. Mrs Deedes looks much happier. But surely hers is a fool's paradise.
See also: living, paradise
References in classic literature ?
Why does our brigand-courier call this his chief fortress and the Paradise of Thieves?
Another order was given; there was a noise of dismounting, and a tall officer with cocked hat, a grey imperial, and a paper in his hand appeared in the gap that was the gate of the Paradise of Thieves.
In short," said Muscari, "to the real Paradise of Thieves.
It may be so, but it is not paradise now, and one would be as happy outside of it as he would be likely to be within.
But I do not think you can hope to read Paradise Lost with true pleasure yet a while.
But in spite of Adam, in spite of everything that can be said against it, Paradise Lost remains a splendid poem.
It was soon after this third marriage that Paradise Lost was finished and published.
People now came to visit the author of Paradise Lost, as before they had come to visit great Cromwell's secretary.
It is not graceful, and it makes one hot; but it is a blessed sort of work, and if Eve had had a spade in Paradise and known what to do with it, we should not have had all that sad business of the apple.
I also became a poet and for one year lived in a paradise of my own creation; I imagined that I also might obtain a niche in the temple where the names of Homer and Shakespeare are consecrated.
But my dear child, you can't expect to find such a paradise on the earth," Hall continued.
A little later in the evening, the subject of farming having remained uppermost, Hall swept off into a diatribe against the "gambler's paradise," which was his epithet for the United States.
I have had the pleasure of seeing it under many circumstances during the last three years, and it's--a Paradise.
He only called it a Paradise because he first saw her coming, and so made her out within her hearing to be an angel, Confusion to him
This Gowan when he had talked about a Paradise, had gone up to her and taken her hand.