pan

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Related to pans: PNAS, pans out

the best thing since sliced pan

Extremely good, wonderful, impressive, or revolutionary, often said facetiously or sarcastically. Taken from the more common expression "the best thing since sliced bread." In this usage, a pan, in which a loaf of bread is baked, refers to the loaf of bread itself. Primarily heard in Ireland. I don't care what you say, I think she's the best thing since sliced pan! This new smartphone design really is the best thing since sliced pan.
See also: pan, since, slice, thing

go down the pan

To fail or be completely and irreversibly wasted, lost, or destroyed. Primarily heard in UK. In an instant, we saw all our hopes for our business go down the pan.
See also: down, pan

down the pan

Completely and irreversibly wasted, lost, or destroyed. Primarily heard in UK. In an instant, we saw all our hopes for our business go down the pan. All those years of research down the pan. I guess it's back to the drawing board.
See also: down, pan

Peter Pan syndrome

A psychological state or condition in which a grown person cannot or refuses to act like an adult; a stubborn and persistent immaturity found in an adult person. I seem cursed to only find men who have some damned Peter Pan syndrome. I'm tired of going out with guys who act like children!
See also: pan, peter, syndrome

flash in the pan

Someone or something whose success or popularity is short-lived. With only one hit song, it was obvious that the young pop star was going to be just another flash in the pan. The new startup created a lot of buzz, but it ended up being just another flash in the pan, out of business after just two years.
See also: flash, pan

flash in the pan

Fig. someone or something that draws a lot of attention for a very brief time. I'm afraid that my success as a painter was just a flash in the pan. Tom had hoped to be a major film star, but his career was only a flash in the pan.
See also: flash, pan

If ifs and ands were pots and pans (there'd be no work for tinkers' hands).

Prov. Wishing for things is useless. (Often said in reply to someone who says something beginning with "If only....") Daughter: If only we didn't have to move out of town, I'd be the happiest girl in the world. Grandmother: If ifs and ands were pots and pans, there'd be no work for tinkers' hands.
See also: and, if, pan, pot

*out of the frying pan (and) into the fire

Fig. from a bad situation to a worse situation. (*Typically: get ~; go ~; jump ~.) When I tried to argue about my fine for a traffic violation, the judge charged me with contempt of court. I really went out of the frying pan into the fire. I got deeply in debt. Then I really got out of the frying pan into the fire when I lost my job.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

pan across to someone or something

to turn or rotate a film or television camera so that the picture follows movement or moves to and settles on someone or something. The camera panned across to Mary, who was sitting, looking out the window. The camera operator panned across to the window on the opposite side of the room.
See also: across, pan

pan for something

to search for a precious metal, usually gold, by using a pan to locate the bits of metal in sand and gravel in a stream bed. When I was in Alaska, I panned for gold in a little stream set aside for tourists. The old prospector spent many hours panning for gold.
See also: pan

pan in

(on someone or something) Go to zoom in (on someone or something).
See also: pan

pan out

 
1. and zoom out to move back to a wider angle picture using a zoom lens. The camera zoomed out. Pan out at this point in the script and give a wider view of the scene.
2. Go to turn out (all right).
See also: out, pan

pan over someone or something

to turn or rotate a film or television camera so that the picture moves across a view of someone or something. The camera panned over the skyline, picking up interesting cloud formations. It panned over Roger as if he weren't there—which is exactly the effect the director wanted.
See also: pan

turn out

[for something] to aim outward. Her toes turned out just right for a ballet dancer. The legs of the chair turned out just a little, adding a bit of stability.
See also: out, turn

turn out (all right)

 and pan out; work out (all right)
to end satisfactorily. I hope everything turns out all right. Oh, yes. It'll all pan out. Things usually work out, no matter how bad they seem.
See also: out, turn

turn out

(for something) [for people, especially an audience] to [leave home to] attend some event. A lot of people turned out for our meeting. Almost all the residents turned out for the meeting.
See also: out, turn

turn out

somehow to end in a particular way, such as well, badly, all right, etc. I hope everything turns out all right. The party did not turn out well.
See also: out, turn

turn out (that)

to happen; to end up; to result. After it was all over, it turned out that both of us were pleased with the bargain. Have you heard how the game turned out?
See also: out, turn

turn someone out

 
1. Lit. to send someone out of somewhere. I didn't pay my rent, so the manager turned me out. I'm glad it's not winter. I'd hate to turn out someone in the snow.
2. Fig. to train or produce someone with certain skills or talents. The state law school turns lawyers out by the dozen. A committee accused the state university of turning out too many veterinarians.
See also: out, turn

turn something out

 
1. to manufacture or produce something in numbers. The factory turns too few cars out. The factory turns out about seventy-five cars a day.
2. to turn off a light. Please turn the hall light out. Turn out the light.
See also: out, turn

zoom in

 (on someone or something)
1. . and pan in (on someone or something) to move in to a close-up picture of someone or something, using a zoom lens or a similar lens. The camera zoomed in on the love scene. The camera operator panned in slowly.
2. . to fly or move rapidly at someone or something. The hawk zoomed in on the sparrow. The angry bees zoomed in on Jane and stung her. When the door opened, the cat zoomed in.
3. . to concentrate on a matter related to someone or a problem. Let's zoom in on this matter of debt. She zoomed in and dealt quickly with the problem at hand.
See also: zoom

a flash in the pan

briefly successful or popular At first, some of the major record labels thought rock ’n’ roll was just a flash in the pan.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form no flash in the pan (successful or popular for more than a brief period): This trend is no flash in the pan.
See also: flash, pan

out of the frying pan (into the fire)

from a bad situation to an even worse one Many kids who run away from unhappy homes discover they've jumped out of the frying pan into the fire when they try to live on their own.
Usage notes: often used with jump, as in the example
See also: fry, of, out, pan

pan out

to happen or be successful He was very creative, although not all his ideas have panned out.
See also: out, pan

down the toilet

wasted or lost down the drain Appearing on that talk show is usually a sign that your career is already down the toilet.
Usage notes: often used with go: He never showed up to drive us, and our plans for the evening went down the toilet.
See also: down, toilet

turn out

to happen or become known to happen in a particular way She assured him that everything would turn out all right. It turns out that Ray had borrowed the money from one of his students.
See also: out, turn

turn out (for something)

to come, appear, or be present for something A lot of students turned out for the demonstration. The last time she performed here the whole town turned out.
See also: out, turn

turn out something

also turn something out
to produce or make something Which university turns out the most successful scientists? The factory is turning the dolls out as fast as it can.
See also: out, turn

turn somebody out (of somewhere)

to force someone to leave a place They turned him out of the shelter when they discovered he was using drugs. She was forced to leave home, turned out at the age of 16.
See also: out, turn

zoom in (on something)

to view something more closely The software lets you zoom in so you can check the details of any part of the picture.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of zoom in (to move quickly toward something)
See also: zoom

down the toilet

  (British, American & Australian informal) also down the pan (British informal)
if something goes down the toilet, it is wasted or spoiled After the drug scandal, his career went down the toilet. If the factory closes, that'll be a million pounds' worth of investment down the pan.
See also: down, toilet

a flash in the pan

something that happens only once or for a short time and will not be repeated We're hoping that this is a long-term opportunity, and not just a flash in the pan.
See also: flash, pan

jump out of the frying pan (and) into the fire

to go from a bad situation to an even worse one Many kids who run away from unhappy homes discover they've jumped out of the frying pan and into the fire.
See also: fire, fry, jump, of, out, pan

flash in the pan

An effort or person that promises great success but fails. For example, His second novel proved to be a flash in the pan, or We had high hopes for the new director, but she was a flash in the pan. This metaphoric term alludes to the 17th-century flintlock musket, which could be fired only when the flash of the priming powder in the lockpan ignited the charge in the bore. When it failed to ignite, there was only a flash in the pan and the gun did not shoot.
See also: flash, pan

out of the frying pan into the fire

From a bad situation to one that is much worse. For example, After Karen quit the first law firm she went to one with even longer hours-out of the frying pan into the fire . This expression, a proverb in many languages, was first recorded in English in 1528.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

pan out

Turn out well, succeed, as in If I don't pan out as a musician, I can always go back to school. This expression alludes to washing gold from gravel in a pan. [Mid-1800s]
See also: out, pan

turn out

1. Shut off, as in He turned out the light. [Late 1800s]
2. Arrive or assemble for an event, as in A large number of voters turned out for the rally. [Mid-1700s]
3. Produce, as in They turn out three thousand cars a month. [Mid-1700s]
4. Be found to be in the end; also, end up, result, as in The rookie turned out to be a fine fielder, or The cake didn't turn out very well. [First half of 1700s] Also see turn out all right.
5. Equip, outfit, as in The bride was turned out beautifully. [First half of 1800s]
6. Get out of bed, as in Come on, children; time to turn out. [Colloquial; early 1800s]
7. Evict, expel, as in The landlord turned out his tenant. [Early 1500s]
See also: out, turn

pan out

v.
1. To prove successful, effective, or satisfactory; turn out well: I'm glad to see that your business plan has panned out.
2. To have some specified result: My plans panned out poorly.
See also: out, pan

turn out

v.
1. To turn some light off: We turned out the lights. I turned the light out.
2. To arrive or assemble, as for a public event or entertainment: Many protesters have turned out for the rally.
3. To produce something, as by a manufacturing process; make something: The assembly line turns out 100 cars every hour. The artist turns a new painting out every week.
4. To be found to be something, as after experience or trial: The rookie turned out to be the team's best hitter. It turns out that he knew about the crime all along.
5. To end up; result: The cake turned out beautifully.
6. To equip someone or something; outfit someone or something. Used chiefly in the passive: The troops were turned out lavishly. They were turned out in brilliant colors.
7. To get out of bed: We turned out before the sun was up.
8. To get someone out of bed: The babysitter turned the children out at 8:00.
9. To evict someone; expel someone: The landlord turned out the tenants. The hotel turned the rowdy guests out.
See also: out, turn

zoom in

v.
1. To simulate movement toward an object with or as if with a zoom lens: The director zoomed in on a face in the crowd. The shot zooms in through a window to a family sitting at a table.
2. To increase the apparent size of part of an image of something in order to view it more closely, as when using a magnifying lens: The camera can't zoom in far enough to capture their expressions. Zoom in on this part of the document too see whether the text lines up with the illustration.
3. To enter rapidly: The firefighting helicopter zoomed in to pick up more water.
4. zoom in on To narrow and intensify the examination of someone or something: In our presentation we zoomed in on the financial problems facing the company.
See also: zoom

pan

n. the face. (see also deadpan.) Look at that guy! I’ve never seen such an ugly pan in my life.

pan out

in. [for something] to work out or turn out all right. Don’t worry. Everything will pan out okay.
See also: out, pan

zoom in

verb
See also: zoom

flash in the pan

One that promises great success but fails.
See also: flash, pan

flash in the pan

An ultimate disappointment after a promising start. Flintlock muskets and pistols had a priming pan that was filled with a small quality of gunpowder. When the trigger was pulled, the flint struck a piece of steel to create a spark that ignited the powder, which in turn set off the main gunpowder charge to launch the musket ball. Whenever the flint-and-steel spark failed to light the main charge, there was a flash in the pan, but no shot. And that was the disappointment after a potentially useful beginning.
See also: flash, pan
References in classic literature ?
At last, of the pan of dirt nothing remained but his golden herd.
He could not forbear another survey of the hill before filling the pan farther down the stream.
Returning to where he had started operations, he began to pan up the stream.
Pan by pan, he went up the stream, the tally of results steadily decreasing.
When he filled a pan with dirt, he ran down the hill to wash it; nor could he forbear running up the hill again, panting and stumbling profanely, to refill the pan.
Nightfall found him by the edge of the stream his eyes wrestling with the gathering darkness over the washing of a five-dollar pan.
He dropped it into his pan and examined another piece.
Still squatting on his heels, he continued examining the fragments and tossing them into the pan.
He continued rubbing the dirt from the quartz fragments and throwing the gold into the pan.
His body crumpled in like a leaf withered in sudden heat, and he came down, his chest across his pan of gold, his face in the dirt and rock, his legs tangled and twisted because of the restricted space at the bottom of the hole.
Chemist Kurunthachalam Kannan and his New York State government team, based in Albany, performed the tests on four brands of nonstick fry pans and two brands of microwave popcorn.
Bake in a preheated 325-degree oven 15 minutes, rotating pans once halfway through baking.
A recent study by the Culinary Institute of America showed that using these pan liners reduces the time needed to wash pans by more than half.
A panel of trainee chefs was asked to try the pans and it found that the non-stick pans lived up to their name - food didn't stick during cooking and they were easy to clean.
Fill any unused muffin cups in the pan halfway up with water prior to baking to help nearby muffins bake evenly, keep them from drying out and protect metal pans from warping in the high oven heat.