palm

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bear the palm

To win. Palm leaves were formerly used as symbols of victory. I heard that you might bear the palm at the science fair! Congratulations—it would be a well-deserved victory.
See also: bear, palm

cross (one's) palm

To pay someone, often as a bribe. Well, if you cross my palm, I might remember a few details about the people you're asking about. I crossed her palm to make sure she won't come after us.
See also: cross, palm

cross someone's palm with silver

Fig. to pay money to someone in payment for a service. (A fortune-teller might ask for a potential customer to cross her palm with silver. Used in that sense or jocularly for something like tipping a porter.) I crossed his palm with silver, but he still stood there. You will find that things happen much faster in hotels if you cross the staff's palms with silver fairly often.
See also: cross, palm, silver

grease someone's palm

 and oil someone's palm
Fig. to bribe someone. If you want to get something done around here, you have to grease someone's palm. I'd never oil a police officer's palm. That's illegal.
See also: grease, palm

*itchy palm

 and *itching palm
Fig. [of a hand] in need of a tip. (As if placing money in the palm would stop the itching. *Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) All the waiters at that restaurant have itchy palms. The cabdriver was troubled by an itching palm. Since he refused to carry my bags, I gave him nothing. Whenever he sees expensive luggage, the hotel doorman gets an itching palm.
See also: itchy, palm

know someone or something like the palm of one's hand

 and know someone or something like the back of one's hand; know someone or something like a book
to know someone or something very well. Of course I know John. I know him like the back of my hand. I know him like a book.
See also: hand, know, like, of, palm

palm someone or something off (on someone) (as someone or something)

 and pass someone or something off (on someone) (as someone or something); pawn someone or something off (on someone) (as someone or something)
Fig. to give someone or something to someone as a gift that appears to be someone or something desirable. (As if the gift had been concealed in one's palm until it was gotten rid of.) Are you trying to palm that annoying client off on me as a hot prospect? Don't palm off that pest on me. Please don't pass that problem off on me as a challenge. Don't pass it off on me! Don't pawn it off on me as something of value.
See also: off, palm

grease somebody's palm

also grease the palm of somebody
to give someone money to persuade them to do what you want Some of those candidates spent money greasing the palms of local political bosses.
See also: grease, palm

in the palm of your hand

under your complete control The audience was fascinated - he held them in the palm of his hand.
See also: hand, of, palm

palm off something

also palm something off
to trick or persuade someone to take something They palmed off cheap wine at high prices by putting it in fancy bottles. She produced fake stamps and palmed them off as genuine.
Related vocabulary: fob something off on somebody
See also: off, palm

grease somebody's palm

to give money to someone in authority in order to persuade them to do something for you, especially something wrong Drug barons were greasing the palm of the chief of police.
See also: grease, palm

have somebody in the palm of your hand

  also have somebody eating out of the palm of your hand
to have so much control over someone that they will do whatever you want them to do She's got her boyfriend eating out of the palm of her hand. It was such an amazing performance - he had the audience in the palm of his hand.
See grease palm
See also: hand, have, of, palm

cross someone's palm with silver

Pay for a service; pay in advance. For example, I'll give you all the details, but first cross my palm with silver. This phrase alludes to the old practice of placing silver coins across a gypsy fortuneteller's hand before having one's fortune told. Today it is sometimes used in a jocular way to ask for a bribe or a tip, as in the example. [c. 1700] Also see grease someone's palm.
See also: cross, palm, silver

grease someone's palm

Also, oil someone's palm or hand . Give someone money in exchange for a favor; also, bribe someone. For example, If you want you luggage to make the plane, be sure to grease the porter's palm. This term uses grease in the sense of "enrich." [First half of 1500s]
See also: grease, palm

itchy palm

Also, itching palm. A desire for money, greed; also, wanting a bribe. For example, The porter has an itchy palm; he wants a big tip, or The mayor was known for his itchy palm. This expression alludes to placing money in the palm of the hand. [Late 1500s]
See also: itchy, palm

palm off

Pass off by deception, substitute with intent to deceive, as in The salesman tried to palm off a zircon as a diamond, or The producer tried to palm her off as a star from the Metropolitan Opera. This expression alludes to concealing something in the palm of one's hand. It replaced the earlier palm on in the early 1800s.
See also: off, palm

palm off

v.
To get rid of or dispose of something by fraud or deception; fob off: The crooked merchant palmed off a lot of fake diamonds before being caught. Someone tried to palm some old coins off on me yesterday, saying they were rare and valuable.
See also: off, palm

flesh-presser

and palm-presser
n. a politician. Being a flesh-presser is risky during flu season. A palm-presser came to our door to ask us what we thought about his issues.

palm-presser

verb

grease someone’s palm

tv. to pay someone a bribe. I had to grease the clerk’s palm in order to get the job done.
See also: grease, palm

palm

tv. to conceal something in the hand as in a theft or the performance of a magic trick; to receive and conceal a tip or a bribe. The kid palmed the candy bar and walked right out of the store.

palm someone/something off (on someone)

tv. to transfer some unwanted person or thing to another person. Don’t palm her off on me. I don’t want her.
See also: off, on, palm

palm someone/something off

verb
See also: off, palm

palm something off (on someone)

tv. to succeed in spending counterfeit money; to succeed in cashing a bad check. (Underworld.) Max palmed four phony twenties off in less than an hour.
See also: off, on, palm

palm something off

verb
See also: off, palm

palm-oil

n. a bribe; a tip. How much palm-oil does it take to get this deed recorded in reasonable time?

cross (someone's) palm

To pay, tip, or bribe.
See also: cross, palm

an itchy palm

A strong desire for money, especially bribes.
See also: itchy, palm
References in periodicals archive ?
A palmful of wholegrain fibre (oats, wild rice, wholegrain rice, quinoa, wholegrain/seeded bread) STEP 2: SUPER SNACKS ?
Although healthy fats are equally high in calories, Ian recommends eating oily fish a few times a week to keep skin healthy, and a small palmful of nuts and seeds every day.
The good, the bad and the ugly: Six days per week, be good and eat well by having three balanced meals per day, with a fist-and-a-half of lean protein (fish, chicken, eggs, soya, nuts/seeds, beans), a large portion of colourful vegetables and a palmful of wholegrains (wild rice, wholemeal pasta, quinoa, oats).
Use a palmful of the Sparkle Skin under the shower in massaging strokes and follow with a spritz of Quick Gloss.
Eating - good portion control - a handful of protein, palmful of wholegrains, half a plate of vegetables and fruit and lots of drizzled oil - use the 80/20 rule.
Plates should have an abundance of veg, good portion of meat/fish/ alternative protein, plus a few palmfuls of wholegrains.
Plates should have an abundance of veg, good portion of meat/sh/ alternative protein, plus a few palmfuls of wholegrains.
But weaning can test the resolve of the most disciplined of animals - faced with pieces of flying potato and palmfuls of pureed apple, the dog's behaviour is fast descending into anarchy.
But weaning can test the resolve of the most disciplined of animals ( faced with pieces of flying potato and palmfuls of pureed apple, the dog's behaviour is fast descending into anarchy.
And then King remembered: "I am very carefully wiping palmfuls of blood out of my face with my left hand.