oyster

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mountain oysters

A food made from animal testicles, often those of a sheep or calf. A: "Let's get some mountain oysters!" B: "Are you sure? Did you read the description in menu?"
See also: mountain, oyster

apples and oranges

Two unlike things or people. Oh, you can't compare those two companies, they're apples and oranges! My mom and my mother-in-law are just apples and oranges and should not be left alone in the same room for too long.
See also: and, apple, orange

the world is (one's) oyster

One can do anything one wants in life. You have so much talent at such a young age—the world is your oyster!
See also: oyster, world

apples and oranges

Fig. two entities that are not similar. (Used especially in reference to comparisons of unlike things.) You can't talk about Fred and Ted in the same breath! They're like apples and oranges. Talking about her current book and her previous bestseller is like comparing apples and oranges.
See also: and, apple, orange

The world is one's oyster.

Fig. One rules the world.; One is in charge of everything. I feel like the world is my oyster today. The world is my oyster! I'm in love!
See also: oyster, world

apples and oranges

Unlike objects or persons, as in Assessing the problems of the neighborhood grocery by examining a giant supermarket is comparing apples and oranges . This metaphor for dissimilarity began as apples and oysters, which appeared in John Ray's proverb collection of 1670. It is nearly always accompanied by a warning that one cannot compare such different categories.
See also: and, apple, orange

world is one's oyster, the

Everything is going well, as in I was younger then, and the world was my oyster. In this term the oyster is something from which to extract great profit (a pearl). It was probably invented by Shakespeare in The Merry Wives of Windsor (2:2): "Why then, the world's mine oyster, which I with sword will open."
See also: world

apples and oranges

If you say that two things are apples and oranges, you mean that they are completely different and cannot be compared. We really can't compare the data any more, it's not the same — it's just apples and oranges. Note: You can also say that comparing two things is like comparing apples with oranges. To compare one with the other is to make the mistake we were all warned about in third grade, not to compare apples with oranges.
See also: and, apple, orange

the world is your oyster

If you tell someone the world is your oyster, you mean that they can do anything they like and go anywhere they like. When I was 29 I was a millionaire. You come from nothing and suddenly the world is your oyster. Think of all the opportunities before you. The world is your oyster. Note: This expression suggests that success can be taken from the world in the same way that pearls can be taken from oysters. This idea was used by Shakespeare in `The Merry Wives Of Windsor': `Why, then the world's mine oyster, Which I with sword will open.' (Act 2, Scene 2)
See also: oyster, world

apples and oranges

(of two people or things) irreconcilably or fundamentally different. North American
See also: and, apple, orange

the world is your oyster

you are in a position to take the opportunities that life has to offer.
This expression may come from Shakespeare 's The Merry Wives of Windsor: ‘Why, then the world's mine oyster, Which I with sword will open’. The humorously malapropistic variant the world is your lobster was popularized by the Thames TV series Minder ( 1979–94 ).
1998 Times I was never brought up thinking, ‘You are an Asian woman so you can't do things.’ I was always given the impression that the world was my oyster.
See also: oyster, world

ˌapples and ˈoranges

(American English) used to describe a situation in which two people or things are completely different from each other: He was no competition for me: it was like apples and oranges.
See also: and, apple, orange

the ˌworld is your ˈoyster

you have the freedom to do what you want, go where you want, etc. in the future because you are young, successful, rich, etc: What do you mean, you don’t know what to do with your life? The world is your oyster!
See also: oyster, world

the world is one’s oyster

sent. one rules the world; one is in charge of everything. I feel like the world is my oyster, today.
See also: oyster, world

the world is your oyster

Anything you wish is yours for the taking. This piece of advice, usually given to youngsters, suggests that their future holds great riches, the way an oyster contains a pearl, and all they need do is use education, skill, or another talent to pry open the metaphorical bivalve and claim their reward. In Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor, the character Pistol is heard to say, “Why then the world's mine oyster / Which I with sword will open.”
See also: oyster, world
References in classic literature ?
Soon as we sell some oysters we'll outfit in style.
Every now and again the clouds thinned before the face of the moon, and we could see the big oysters quite distinctly.
Charley and I roamed the docks, wondering what we should do, and so came upon the oyster fleet lying at the Oakland City Wharf.
Charley whispered, when we passed from the view of the oyster fleet.
The situation is growing desperate, and something must be done to determine whether I or that band of ruffians own those oyster beds.
Charley and I knew nothing of the oyster industry, while his head was an encyclopaedia of facts concerning it.
The oyster pirates, a fleet of a dozen sloops, were lying at anchor on what was known as the "Deserted Beds.
The oyster pirates lay snugly together at short hawsers, the weather being fine, and they protested loudly at our ignorance in putting out such an unwarranted length of anchor-chain.
They are not regular oyster pirates," Nicholas continued.
After half a mile of the mud, we came upon a deep channel, up which we rowed, with dead oyster shoals looming high and dry on either side.
Two other Whitehalls followed us, and as the moon now shone brightly, we easily made out the oyster pirates on their lonely shoal.
It was a mild and shivering band of pirates that we marched up the beach to the oyster house.
But still it's queer to me, just as at this moment it seems queer to me that we country folks try to get our meals over as soon as we can, so as to be ready for our work, while here are we trying to drag out our meal as long as possible, and with that object eating oysters.
To-morrow I would be an oyster pirate, as free a freebooter as the century and the waters of San Francisco Bay would permit.
At Ondine, Valentine's Day and oysters are always in high demand.