out of sight


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

*out of sight

 
1. not visible; too far away to be seen. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; go ~; keep ~; stay ~.) The cat kept out of sight until the mouse came out. "Get out of sight, or they'll see you!" called John.
2. figuratively stunning, unbelievable, or awesome. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) Wow, this music is out of sight! What a wild party. It's out of sight!
3. Fig. very expensive; high in price. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; go ~.) Prices at that restaurant are out of sight. The cost of medical care has gone out of sight.
4. Sl. heavily intoxicated. (*Typically: be ~.) They've been drinking since noon, and they're out of sight. Man, is she ever out of sight!
See also: of, out, sight

out of sight

at a very high level Medical costs are out of sight. Daytime temperatures in the desert will be out of sight by mid-June.
See also: of, out, sight

out of sight

  (American)
if the amount of something, especially money, is out of sight, it is very large The cost of health care in this country is going out of sight. These executives in big corporations get salaries that are out of sight.
See also: of, out, sight

out of sight

1. Also, out of someone's sight. Out of the range of vision, as in Stay out of sight while they're visiting, or Don't let the baby out of your sight in the yard. [c. 1200] This idiom is also used in the phrase get out of someone's sight, meaning "go away"; for example, Jean was furious with Bill and told him to get out of her sight at once.
2. Unreasonable, excessive, as in Our bill for the wine was out of sight. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
3. Excellent, superb, as in The graduation party was out of sight. This phrase is also used as an interjection meaning "Wonderful!" as in Do I like it? Out of sight! [Slang; second half of 1900s]
4. out of sight, out of mind. What is absent is soon forgotten, as in I don't think of them unless they send a Christmas card-out of sight, out of mind, I guess . This phrase has been proverbial since Homer's time; the earliest recorded use in English was about 1450.
See also: of, out, sight

out of sight

1. mod. heavily alcohol or drug intoxicated; high. They’ve been drinking since noon, and they’re out of sight.
2. mod. very expensive; high in price. Prices at that restaurant are out of sight.
See also: of, out, sight

out of sight

Slang
Remarkable; incredible: The graduation party was out of sight.
See also: of, out, sight