ours


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get (one's)

1. To receive the due punishment (for something) that one deserves. Don't worry about those stool pigeons, we'll make sure they get theirs when the time is right. She cheated off me during the test? Oh, she'll get hers, alright!
2. To become wealthy or financially successful. After growing up in poverty, Jim was determined to get his no matter what it took.
See also: get

be (one's) for the asking

To be available for one to easily obtain or achieve. With your famous parents, any job is yours for the asking. Some of us, though, actually have to apply for jobs.
See also: ask

be (one's) for the taking

To be available for one to easily obtain or achieve. With your famous parents, any job is yours for the taking. Some of us, though, actually have to apply for jobs. Our probable valedictorian has been pretty distracted lately, so I think the title is yours for the taking.
See also: taking

ours not to reason why

It is not someone's position or place to question or defy a situation, order, or the way things are done. Adapted from a line from Lord Alfred Tennyson's 1854 poem "The Charge of the Light Brigade," describing the British cavalry as they obeyed orders to ride+C1926 into certain death in the Crimean War. Originally phrased as "theirs not to reason why." As soldiers, we are trained to follow orders, ours not to reason why; after all, a soldier constantly second-guessing orders will not be very effective.
See also: not, ours, reason, why
References in classic literature ?
Nor was it generally understood that since Mars is older than our earth, with scarcely a quarter of the superficial area and remoter from the sun, it necessarily follows that it is not only more distant from time's beginning but nearer its end.
And before we judge of them too harshly we must remem- ber what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races.
Had our instru- ments permitted it, we might have seen the gathering trouble far back in the nineteenth century.
People in these latter times scarcely realise the abundance and enterprise of our nineteenth-century papers.
In the morning, after having had our sleep, we crept back to the fire.
We squatted down by the fire, and with heads bent forward on our knees, made believe to sleep.
It was the most monumental work we had ever effected with our hands, and we were proud of it.
We huddled, with our arms around each other, until the heat began to reach us and the odor of burning hair was in our nostrils.
We had but one idea, and that was to get away, though we could not forbear humoring our curiosity by peeping out upon the village.
We saw some of the part-grown boys shooting with bow and arrow, and we sneaked back into the thicker forest and made our way to the river.
So occupied were we with our paddling, our eyes fixed upon the other bank, that we knew nothing until aroused by a yell from the shore.
As we swept on to the west, the Fire People far behind, a familiar scene flashed upon our eyes.
And that night we slept in our own little cave high up on the cliff, though first we had to evict a couple of pugnacious youngsters who had taken possession.
There was no hope for him, but we did our best, and he was so grateful that when he died he left us his body that we might discover the mysteries of his complaint, and so be able to help others afflicted in the same way.
He needs our support, he needs the help of his fellow Filipinos in fighting for what is ours.