ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

Prov. If you put in a little effort to prevent a problem, you will not have to put in a lot of effort to solve the problem. Brush your teeth every day; that way you won't have to go to the dentist to have cavities filled. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. If you get in the habit of being careful with your new stereo, chances are you won't break it and have to have it fixed later. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Every mom knows an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
In cases such as these, it's best to heed Ben Franklin's advice that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,'' said Jane Frye, High Desert Medical Group's clinical administrator.
There's a wise, old saying: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
If the FDA seems to be getting overly picky, demanding more and more tests before approving a new drug, CEOs should remember that old medical advice: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
I believe it was Edison who eloquently conveyed, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
The chemical industry itself may find that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
But that old saying an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure really holds true.
The old saying, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure," is not really taken seriously in the risk management profession and by boards of directors.
The old adage is true: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure," says Robert Belshe, director of the division of infectious diseases at Saint Louis University's medical school.
The old saw, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure," comes to mind.
If you find there is work to be done, remember the old but very valid cliche: "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
Although the Mesa Crime-Free Multi-Housing Program reviews the eviction process with managers, the program is governed by the philosophy that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
We had all learned (three times) that trying to walk with calked boots on rock is like rollerskating, that we should keep our pant cuffs "stagged" to prevent them from catching underbrush, and that" an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.