option

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Related to options: Derivatives

keep your options open

also leave your options open
to wait before making a choice I want to keep my options open, so I didn't sign the contract yet.
See also: keep, open, option

All options stink

and AOS
phr. & comp. abb. All options stink.; There is no good solution. I don’t know what to do. All options stink. Since AOS, I’ll do nothing at all.
See also: all, option, stink
References in periodicals archive ?
Backdating of options occurs when a date earlier than the formal grant date is selected as the grant date for purposes of setting the exercise price of options.
Stock options are a popular method of motivating and retaining employees.
To estimate the fair value of employee options, companies must use an option-pricing model such as Black-Scholes-Merton or lattice.
That is, compensation cost arising from the issuance of stock options may be expensed or capitalized in the same way as cash compensation.
An options mindset is critical to successful management in changing times.
With their higher hurdle, leveraged options are worth perhaps only half as much as standard options, particularly if their term is limited to five years.
He must be approximately four years deep and four yards outside of the QB while the option read is being identified.
May" was the expiration date; options expire on the third Friday of the indicated month so this option would expire on May 21.
Incentive stock options must be granted pursuant to a plan approved by the shareholders of the corporation granting the options within 12 months before or after the date on which the plan is adopted.
Initially, FLEX Options will be available on the S&P 100 and S&P 500 stock indexes.
The Option Center provides the perfect mix of options investing education and screens that might provide some good potential investing ideas," said Ratzky.
Because the arrangement was an option in form and substance, Freddie Mac had properly deferred including the commitment fees in gross income until the date the options were exercised or lapsed; see Old Harbor Native Corp.
Because the lattice model makes it easy to vary assumptions and inputs over time, entities that grant a great many stock options to their employees will prefer its flexibility to the relatively rigid restrictions of the Black-Scholes-Merton model, which is more suitable for companies whose employee compensation includes few stock options.
2002-22 and Notice 2002-3 1 apply to some deferred compensation arrangements as well, this discussion will be limited to their application to stock options.