to the teeth

(redirected from one's teeth)

to the teeth

To the greatest degree or extent; extremely, completely, or utterly. I know it takes me a long time getting ready, but nothing feels better than being dressed to the teeth for a night out on the town. Everyone in the bar was armed to the teeth, so we felt a little bit nervous sitting down for a drink in there. I have to say, I'm fed up to the teeth with all the people littering on campus!
See also: teeth

to the teeth

1. Completely, fully, as in Obviously new to skiing, they were equipped to the teeth with the latest gear. This idiom dates from the late 1300s. Also see armed to the teeth; fed to the gills.
2. Also, up to the or one's teeth . Fully committed, as in We're in this collaboration up to our teeth. [First half of 1900s] Both of these hyperbolic usages allude to being fully covered or immersed in something up to one's teeth.
See also: teeth

to the teeth

Lacking nothing; completely: armed to the teeth; dressed to the teeth.
See also: teeth
References in classic literature ?
Those who have never had a bit in their mouths cannot think how bad it feels; a great piece of cold hard steel as thick as a man's finger to be pushed into one's mouth, between one's teeth, and over one's tongue, with the ends coming out at the corner of your mouth, and held fast there by straps over your head, under your throat, round your nose, and under your chin; so that no way in the world can you get rid of the nasty hard thing; it is very bad
All around it looked so cold and raw: the long willow-leaves were quite yellow, and the fog dripped from them like water; one leaf fell after the other: the sloes only stood full of fruit, which set one's teeth on edge.
Is it no harm to have a constant hallooing and hooting under one's very nose, distracting one from business, and making one grind one's teeth with vexation?
Many readers are able, no doubt, merely to disregard them, but there are others, like Lowell, to whom the moral, 'when they come suddenly upon it, gives a shock of unpleasant surprise, as when in eating strawberries one's teeth encounter grit.
It is a hard, embittering thing to have one's kind feelings and good intentions cast back in one's teeth.
to be peeped at like a wild lion through the iron bars--to gnash one's teeth and howl, through the long still night, to the merry ring of a heavy chain and to roll and twine among the straw, transported with such brave music.
An independent state is not built by posing as an all-Balkan backwater tearing apart with one's teeth the pillar that should carry the structure, Kujundziski says.
Look after your little one's teeth with a brand new Phillips Sonicare for Kids toothbrush and toothpaste worth pounds 70 - for free.
They performed a demonstration asking for volunteers from the audience to come up to represent big, strong, healthy teeth, then asked someone to come up and help the soldiers demonstrate with some jumbo size floss to show the other children how to floss one's teeth the correct way.
All love the open road and most avoid references to Nietzschean bugs in one's teeth.
Raising the middle finger in the United States, a Nazi salute, or bearing one's teeth need no explanation.
The Court pointed to activities such as bathing without assistance or brushing one's teeth as major life activities.
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said, "Household chores, bathing, and brushing one's teeth are among the types of manual tasks of central importance to people's daily lives" and should have been considered when a lower court ruled she was disabled.
But after a while, the regimented way in which the cables were distributed became oppressive, and their fineness started to set one's teeth on edge, as if they were made from glinting piano wire.
Should a little furtive flossing cause an accident, Sandoval said the driver could be fined for driving at a speed unsafe for existing conditions - namely, the condition of flossing one's teeth.