one's bearings

*one's bearings

the knowledge of where one is; the knowledge of how one is oriented to one's immediate environment. (*Typically: get ~; find ~; have ~; lose ~; tell one ~.) After he fell, it took Ted a few minutes to get his bearings. Jean found her compass and got her bearings almost immediately.
See also: bearing
References in periodicals archive ?
However, there are situations when one could lose one's bearings.
Applied to the molecular combing technique, which allows the direct visualisation of large regions of the genome, the Genomic Morse Code makes it possible to get one's bearings within the genome, locate genetic events and spot potential anomalies.
In an absorbing story about finding one's bearings, two lonely boys take a trip into the wilderness in 1945.
But it is hard to get one's bearings on just what one is looking at, because from each angle, the perspective changes, and with it the impression of the scale and materials of this mutant sculpture.
Many levels are also populated by cops who, while not smart enough to block escape routes, fire their guns nonstop, making it tough to stop and get one's bearings.
There are enough references to the familiar characters and events of The Wizard of Oz to comfort the traveler, but it takes a while to get one's bearings.
They have adapted themselves to the new situation diversely, and it can often be seen that there are only a few guidelines for Czech schools, along with their students and teachers, to find one's bearings in the tangle of offers.
As far as I remember, the Ponte dei Tre Archi is the last bridge crossing the Rio di Canareggio before the lagoon (I know, though, how easy it is to lose one's bearings when the ocean is in the wrong direction).
It was found that changing technology demands much more of authors and that hypertext articles can be hard to find or to locate one's bearings in once inside.