one's fair share

(one's) fair share (of something)

All that one deserves, expects, or is entitled to, whether that be a good or a bad thing. Usually preceded by "more than" to indicate an excessive amount. Leave the rest for the others, you've had your fair share. That poor girl has had to endure more than her fair share of trauma at such a young age.
See also: fair, share

one's fair share

the amount of something that one is due relative to what other people are receiving. Let him take more. He didn't get his fair share. I want my fair share. You cheated me! Give me some more!
See also: fair, share
References in periodicals archive ?
It may be simply paying one's fair share of taxes without complaint, or voting for something that doesn't directly benefit oneself but is simply the right thing to do.
Both sides tend to defend their bargaining positions as representing nothing worse than an insistence on not doing more than one's fair share until others have done their fair share.
This is obviously not a universally effective tactic, either, but it is particularly appropriate when one already has a moral duty to act and it is abundantly clear that one's fair share of the burden is well in excess of anything one has yet contributed.
But it is instructive to ask why access to health care should be necessary for conserving one's fair share of health.
Of course, access to health care may still be necessary to conserve one's fair share of health, even if other socially controllable factors also make significant contributions to health.
Paying one's fair share of taxes can be a burden, but paying a lot more than one's fair share is infuriating.