on your bike

on your bike

Go away and stop being annoying. (Often stylized as "on yer bike!") God, what a dreadful pun—on your bike! All right kids, on yer bikes, you're starting to get on my nerves!
See also: bike, on

On your bike!

 and Go to your room!
Sl. imperative. Get out of here!; Get on your bike and get out! What a bad joke! No puns allowed here! On your bike! That was a ridiculous remark. Go to your room!
See also: on

on your bike

BRITISH, INFORMAL
People sometimes say on your bike to tell someone angrily to go away. Go on, on your bike, mate! Note: This expression is sometimes spelled `on yer bike', to represent an informal pronunciation of `your'. I've had enough! On yer bike!
See also: bike, on

on your bike!

1 go away! 2 take action! British informal
Sense 2 became a catchphrase in 1980s Britain, when it was used as an exhortation to the unemployed to show initiative in their attempt to find work. It was taken from a speech by the Conservative politician Norman Tebbit in which he said of his unemployed father: ‘He did not riot, he got on his bike and looked for work.’
See also: on

on your bike!

(British English, informal) a rude or humorous way of telling somebody to go away: ‘Can I borrow some money, Dave?’ ‘On your bike!’
See also: on

On your bike!

and Go to your room!
imperative Get out of here!; Go away and stop bothing me. (Neither is to be taken literally.) What a bad joke! No puns allowed here! On your bike! Nasty mouth! Such talk! Go to your room!
See also: on