on top of

(redirected from on top of one another)

on top of something

 
1. Fig. up-to-date on something; knowing about the current state of something. Ask Mary. She's on top of this issue. This issue is constantly changing. She has to pay attention to it to stay on top of things.
2. Fig. in addition to something. Jane told Bill he was dull. On top of that, she said he was unfriendly. On top of being dull, he's unfriendly.
3. Fig. victorious over something; famous or notorious for something. It was a close game, but the home team came out on top. Bill is on top in his field.
See also: of, on, top

on top of something

aware of or in control of a situation The stock market has been unpredictable, and you really have to stay on top of your investments. If Sheila's not staying on top of the applications, I think we should hire an assistant.
See also: of, on, top

on top of something

if you are on top of a situation, you are dealing with it successfully We had a lot of work to do, but I think we're on top of it now.
See also: of, on, top

on top of

1. In control of, fully informed about, as in The weeds were terrible, but the new gardener was soon on top of them, or Our senator always manages to be on top of the issues.
2. In addition to, following closely on, as in Several other benefits are being offered on top of a better salary, or On top of the flu Jane caught her sister's measles. [c. 1600]
3. Also, on top of one another. Very close to, crowded, as in I didn't see her until she was right on top of us, or In these condominiums people are living right on top of one another. [Mid-1900s]
See also: of, on, top

on top of

Informal
1. In control of.
2. Fully informed about: a senator who is always on top of the issues.
3. In addition to; besides: On top of this, several other benefits are being offered.
4. Following closely on; coming immediately after: Hail came on top of a violent thunderstorm.
See also: of, on, top
References in classic literature ?
So Polynesia took him downstairs into the inside of the ship and showed him the beds, set all on top of one another like book-shelves against a wall.
Just a brief glimpse of his immediate surroundings vouchsafed Bradley before he was whisked into the interior of one of the buildings; but in that momentary glance he saw strange piles of stone and wood and mud fashioned into buildings of all conceivable sizes and shapes, sometimes piled high on top of one another, sometimes standing alone in an open court-way, but usually crowded and jammed together, so that there were no streets or alleys between them other than a few which ended almost as soon as they began.
So violently had she heeled over, that the men in the cabin had been thrown on top of one another into the lee bunk, where they squirmed and twisted and were washed about, those underneath being perilously near to drowning.