on the never-never

on the never-never

Having bought something using credit, with many small payments to make (with interest) over many years, as opposed to a single lump sum. Primarily heard in UK. Many people are finding themselves on the never-never as they are forced to use credit cards to afford necessary goods each month. Under the new scheme, a consumer could buy a brand-new car on the never-never and then just trade it in for a newer model in a year's time, with no repercussions.
See also: on

on the ˌnever-ˈnever

(British English, informal) on hire purchase (= by making payments over a long period of time): He bought a new car on the never-never.
See also: on
References in periodicals archive ?
DIAMONDS are forever - and you'd be paying for this beauty that long on the never-never.
We didn't get an electric washing machine until the late fifties - the first thing my father ever bought on the never-never.
She would get a Provident or Sterlers cheque and pay it back on the never-never.
The cost was pounds 185 paid on the never-never, with a deposit and weekly payments of a princely sum of pounds 1.
More and more Irish people are living on the never-never, unable to escape from the boom mentality of spend, spend, spend.