old lady


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old lady

and old woman
1. n. (one’s) mother. (Mildly derogatory.) What time does your old lady get home?
2. n. (one’s) wife. My old woman doesn’t like for me to go out without her.
3. n. (one’s) girlfriend. My old lady and I are getting married next week.
See also: lady, old
References in classic literature ?
said the old lady, after a short pause: 'it's all very fine, I dare say; but I can't hear him.
The old lady made no reply to this; but wiping her eyes first, and her spectacles, which lay on the counterpane, afterwards, as if they were part and parcel of those features, brought some cool stuff for Oliver to drink; and then, patting him on the cheek, told him he must lie very quiet, or he would be ill again.
All this looked charming, but the old lady could not see well, and so had no pleasure in them.
The pretty old lady, after reading it, had just laid it down upon the breakfast-cloth.
Evidently the Frenchwoman looked so becoming in her riding-habit, with her whip in her hand, that she had made an impression upon the old lady.
said the old lady, recovering herself, with her head on one side, from a very low curtsy.
As to Montalais, as her sole reply, she drew the brevet from her pocket, and showed it to the old lady.
The old lady explained to Kim, in a tense, indignant whisper, precisely what manner and fashion of malignant liar he was.
And why not stop to supper, Quilp,' said the old lady, 'if my daughter had a mind?
But she was far from being aware that the old lady had never heard a word of the so-called kinship.
He was endeavoring to make it plain to the old lady that she might remain in Africa if she wished but that for his part his conscience demanded that he return to his father and mother, who doubtless were even now suffering untold sorrow because of his absence; from which it may be assumed that his parents had not been acquainted with the plans that he and the old lady had made for their adventure into African wilds.
When the old lady is uncomfortable, there's sure to be good reason for it.
The old lady was fully satisfied, and kissed me, spoke cheerfully to me, and bid me take care of my health and want for nothing, and so took her leave.
Happening to look at me at the end of her next sentence, the old lady started, and said, in her kindly way,
The great good quality of this old lady has been mentioned.