old lady


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old lady

and old woman
1. n. (one’s) mother. (Mildly derogatory.) What time does your old lady get home?
2. n. (one’s) wife. My old woman doesn’t like for me to go out without her.
3. n. (one’s) girlfriend. My old lady and I are getting married next week.
See also: lady, old
References in classic literature ?
The old lady, who was much less deaf on this subject than on any other, replied in the affirmative.
Miller, who, not being quite so much absorbed as he ought to have been, contrived to commit various high crimes and misdemeanours, which excited the wrath of the fat gentleman to a very great extent, and called forth the good-humour of the old lady in a proportionate degree.
The old lady made a respectful inclination of the head, which seemed to say that she thought the doctor was a very clever man.
The old lady tenderly bade him good-night shortly afterwards, and left him in charge of a fat old woman who had just come: bringing with her, in a little bundle, a small Prayer Book and a large nightcap.
In the afternoon, the old lady heard from everyone that the shoes had been red, and she said that it was very wrong of Karen, that it was not at all becoming, and that in future Karen should only go in black shoes to church, even when she should be older.
The sun shone gloriously; Karen and the old lady walked along the path through the corn; it was rather dusty there.
You see, Mr Witherden,' said the old lady, 'that Abel has not been brought up like the run of young men.
Now, the old lady was exceedingly proud of her bright eyes being so clear that she could read writing without spectacles.
asked the old lady, without the least semblance of ceremony.
Still, it ought to be mentioned that no sooner had my old lady found out John, than John made known to her and me that he had had his eye upon a thankless person by the name of Silas Wegg.
When the leaves are falling from the trees and there are no more flowers in bloom to make up into nosegays for the Lord Chancellor's court," said the old lady, "the vacation is fulfilled and the sixth seal, mentioned in the Revelations, again prevails.
Malicorne is a prince in disguise," replied the old lady, "he is all-powerful, seemingly.
The old lady recognized that, as the eyes and the ears of the lama, he was to be propitiated.
cried the old lady, who did not observe the tell tale nuts at her feet.
You're in the plot--you made him marry, thinking that I'd leave my money from him-- you did, Martha," the poor old lady screamed in hysteric sentences.