offer

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an offer one can't refuse

An offer in which the repercussions for refusing would be so great that to do so would be either be dangerous or ill-advised. It often implies the "offer" is a threat, but this is not always the case. The phrase was coined by Mario Puzo in his 1969 novel The Godfather, and popularized by the 1972 Francis Ford Coppola film adaptation of the same name. If he's not willing to agree to the contract, I might have to bring a few men over and make him an offer he can't refuse. The buyout deal was worth $9 billion to the company, so, really, it was an offer we couldn't refuse.
See also: offer, one, refuse

offer affordance(s)

To provide the means for something to happen or take place. Of course, man-made systems of organization in any field inherently offer affordances for error and exploitation, as the human element can neither be escaped nor denied. While many see the increasing amount of technology as a detriment to children's minds, one cannot underestimate how it also offers affordance to their increased capacity to learn and access information.
See also: offer

offer the olive branch (to someone)

To extend an offer or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc. (to someone), so as to end a disagreement or dispute. (Can also be formulated as "offer someone the olive branch.") The conservatives in Congress seem to be offering the olive branch to Democrats on the issue of raising the debt ceiling. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to offer the olive branch. I was still hurt by the way my parents had lied to me, but I decided to offer them the olive branch at Christmas.
See also: branch, offer, olive

offer an olive branch (to someone)

To extend an offer or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc. (to someone), so as to end a disagreement or dispute. (Can also be formulated as "offer someone an olive branch.") The conservatives in Congress seem to be offering an olive branch to Democrats on the issue of raising the debt ceiling. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to offer an olive branch. I was still hurt by the way my parents had lied to me, but I decided to offer them an olive branch at Christmas.
See also: branch, offer, olive

offer (someone) (one's) condolences

To extend a semi-formal declaration or expression of sympathy to someone who has experienced a recent pain, grief, or misfortune, especially the death of a relative or loved one. Tom, I just heard about your wife's passing and wanted to offer my most sincere condolences. We're calling over after lunch to offer condolences to the family. Jane wasn't able to make it to the funeral, but she wanted to offer you her condolences nonetheless.
See also: offer

give chapter and verse

To provide full, specific, and authoritative information to support some quote, question, or issue at hand. Can also be used with similar verbs such as "offer," "cite," quote," etc. It is a reference to quoting scripture. Don't try to debate Sarah about physics. She'll give chapter and verse until you realize she's right. You can't be so vague if you want to convince me. You'll have to give chapter and verse.
See also: and, chapter, give, verse

hold out an olive branch (to someone)

To extend an offer or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc. (to someone), so as to end a disagreement or dispute. The conservatives in Congress seem to be holding out an olive branch to Democrats on the issue of raising the debt ceiling. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to hold out an olive branch.
See also: branch, hold, olive, out

hold out an/the olive branch

To extend an offer or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc., so as to end a disagreement or dispute. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to hold out the olive branch. I was still hurt by the way my parents had lied to me, but I decided to hold out an olive branch by going home for Christmas.
See also: branch, hold, olive, out

have (something) to offer

To have a trait or skill that is appealing, desirable, or helpful to someone else. She has a lot of experience to offer, and I wouldn't discount that when you look at all the candidates for the job.
See also: have, offer

on offer

1. Available, as for purchase or acquisition. We have a wide range of craft beers on offer, including some from our own in-house microbrewery. There's a car on offer down the road for only $2,000.
2. Offered at a discounted price for a certain, limited period of time. Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. This weekend only, we've got a huge range of appliance and electronics on offer. I saw in the paper that the grocery store has slow cookers on offer—maybe we should go pick one up.
See also: offer, on

under offer

Of a house or building, having an agreement in place for someone to buy the property. Primarily heard in UK. The famous marketplace is under offer, but the buyer wishes to remain anonymous for the time being. With more than a dozen properties under offer, we are becoming one of the most sought after industrial units in the whole of North London.
See also: offer

offer (something) up (to someone or something)

To give or submit something as an offering. The fact that you're expected to offer money up alongside one's prayer and devotion makes be a bit dubious of that church. The restaurant offers up some of the best steak money can buy. We're offering up exclusive deals to our VIP members this weekend at shops across the country.
See also: offer, someone, up

*a helping hand

Fig. help; physical help, especially with the hands. (*Typically: get ~; need ~; give someone ~; offer ~; offer someone ~.) When you feel like you need a helping hand making dinner, just let me know.
See also: hand, helping

make someone an offer

to offer someone an amount of money for something. (Usually an invitation.) Do you like it? Make me an offer.
See also: make, offer

*offer one cannot refuse

Cliché a very attractive offer. (*Typically: give one ~; make ~; make one ~.) He made me an offer I could not refuse, so I sold him my car.
See also: cannot, offer, one, refuse

offer something for something

to suggest a certain amount of money as a purchase price for something. I'll offer you ten bucks for that watch. They offered me very little for my car.
See also: offer

offer something to someone (as something)

to propose giving something to someone as a gift, peace offering, payment, etc. They offered us a bunch of flowers as a peace offering. As an apology, I offered a gift to the hostess.
See also: offer

offer something up (to someone or something)

to give something to someone or something as a mark of devotion, thanks, etc. We offered our gratitude up to the ruler. We offered up our gratitude to the queen.
See also: offer, up

dangle a carrot in front of someone

or

offer someone a carrot

COMMON If you dangle a carrot in front of someone or offer them a carrot, you try to persuade them to do something by offering them a reward. The team have dangled a $17 million carrot in front of the Italian to remain in North America. He is to offer the public a new carrot by reducing petrol prices. Note: The words carrot, dangle and offer are used in other structures and expressions with a similar meaning. Tax cuts may be offered as a carrot to voters ahead of the next election. The money's dangling there like a huge carrot, and you want to grab it. Note: The image here is of someone encouraging a donkey to move forward by holding a carrot in front of it.
See also: carrot, dangle, front, of, someone

hold out an olive branch

or

offer an olive branch

COMMON If you hold out an olive branch or offer an olive branch to someone, you say or do something to show that you want to end a disagreement with them. We are holding out an olive branch, inviting the landowners to talk to us. The authorities have offered an olive branch to the community. Note: You can say that someone accepts an olive branch if they accept the thing that has been said or done to end the disagreement. It would be some time before he would accept the olive branch offered to him. Note: You can use olive branch to mean an offer of peace or friendship. I think the olive branch will have to come from both sides. He invited the world to choose between the gun and the olive branch. Note: The story of the Flood in the Bible tells how Noah sent out first a raven, then a dove, to see if there was any sign of land. If they found some land, it would mean that God had forgiven man: `And the dove came in to him in the evening; and, lo, in her mouth was an olive leaf pluckt off; so Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.' (Genesis 8:11)
See also: branch, hold, olive, out

hold out (or offer) an olive branch

offer a token of peace or goodwill.
A branch of an olive tree is an emblem of peace. In the Bible, it was the token brought by a dove to Noah to indicate that God's anger was assuaged and that the flood had abated (Genesis 8:11).
See also: branch, hold, olive, out

a ˌhelping ˈhand

help: The new charity tries to offer a helping hand to young people who have become addicted to drugs.A helping hand would be very welcome at the moment.
See also: hand, helping

have something to ˈoffer

have something available that somebody wants: Barcelona has a lot to offer its visitors in the way of entertainment.He’s a young man with a great deal to offer (= who is intelligent, has many skills, etc.).
See also: have, offer, something

on ˈoffer


1 that can be bought, used, etc: The following is a list of courses currently on offer.Prizes worth more than $20 000 are on offer to the winner.
2 (especially British English) on sale at a lower price than normal for a short period of time: Italian coffee is on (special) offer this week.
See also: offer, on

under ˈoffer

(British English) if a house or building is under offer, somebody has agreed to buy it at a particular price: They’ve already sold two of their properties, and the third is currently under offer.
See also: offer

hold out/offer an ˈolive branch (to somebody)

show that you want to make peace with somebody: After their argument, he was the first one to hold out an olive branch. OPPOSITE: throw down the gauntletThe olive branch is an ancient symbol of peace.
See also: branch, hold, offer, olive, out

offer up

v.
To submit something as an offering, especially in worship or devotion: At the memorial, they offered prayers up for the victims. Let's offer up free meals during the holidays.
See also: offer, up
References in periodicals archive ?
An OIC must be submitted in writing on the Service's Form 656, Offer in Compromise.
Offers for penalties and interest of more than $50,000.
The tender offer will now expire at 11:00 am New York City time, on January 23, 2007, unless Open Solutions chooses to again extend or to terminate the tender offer as provided in the Offer to Purchase.
Under the new rules, taxpayers may submit offers on photocopied or computer-generated forms.
In each case, holders whose Notes are accepted for payment in the tender offers will receive accrued and unpaid interest in respect of such purchased Notes from the last interest payment date to, but not including, the payment date for Notes purchased in the tender offers.
14) Rejection authority is vested in all of these officials regardless of the amount of liability sought to be compromised, except that authority to reject offers for public policy reasons is restricted to District Directors[15]
The new policy confirms positively that offers in compromise are a useful collection tool and a practical alternative to a prolonged installment agreement.
Co Scania offers customer finance services in all European markets and in an increasing number of emerging markets.
The supplemental indentures will not become operative unless and until Notes are accepted for purchase by JLG pursuant to the tender offers.
Semcon has an attractive customer base and makes competitive business offers to the market.
00 as its tender offer price - price will no longer be subject to an increase based upon the termination fee litigation outcome
Hexion intends to use $500 million of the additional cash available under its new credit facilities and from the Secured Debt Financing to pay a common stock dividend to its shareholders and the balance of the proceeds to pay for the Notes repurchased in the Tender Offers.
The solicitation of offers to buy shares of Cumulus common stock will only be made pursuant to the offer to purchase, the letter of transmittal and related documents that Cumulus will file with the Securities and Exchange Commission today and distribute to its stockholders promptly.
It offers the construction industry and the general public innovative solutions bringing greater safety, comfort and quality to their everyday surroundings.