off someone's back

off someone's back

Also off someone's case. No longer harassing or bothering someone. It is often put as get off someone's back or case , as in I told her to get off my back-I'll mow the lawn tomorrow, or I wish Dad would get off my case about grades. The first of these slangy terms dates from the 1880s although it became frequent only in the 1940s, and its antonym, on one's back (as in He's been on my back about that report all morning) dates from about 1960. The variant off someone's case was first recorded only in 1970, and its antonym, on someone's case (as in He's always on my case) in 1971. Also see get off, def. 8.
See also: back, off
References in periodicals archive ?
Whichever way it came we've been saying for a while we needed the ball to go off someone's back or something and he was in the right position and it dropped perfectly for him.
I remember there was a long ball played forward and it came off someone's back and luckily enough I was there.
We just need a bit of luck, one to bounce in off someone's back or ear or anything.
It's the old saying, you just hope the ball comes off someone's back side and goes in, but then he scores a fantastic goal.